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I'm with everyone else. 5-7 days. To get that super hoppy aroma though, I've only been able to get that by using a hop back with first-wort and dry-hopping (clone W. Coast ipa, greenflash). For less than $30 I built a hop back and filtered the wort through loose leaf hops of the same or similar variety I was already pellet-hopping, just prior to chilling, ...


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You should be get a pretty good hop aroma with just dry hopping for the last couple of days in primary. That's always been my plan of attack and it's worked well compared to dry hopping at other periods of primary.


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YMMV, but when we do it, we'll actually wait until primary is nearly finished before dry hopping. If you move to secondary, you could actually pull it off the yeast cake for re-use without getting a ton of hops stuck in your yeast. 4-7 days is good at the end of primary/beginning of secondary should get you want you're after. If you're looking for a HUGE ...


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Trial and error. There is no definite answer. I haven't achieved yet great aroma, so far dry hopped in primary in last couple days. I would add 5 oz per 10gl. Read an article saying its better to dry hop it in keg or closed vessel. Aromas can escape with CO2.


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I have never heard of this in the beer world but in the wine world "legs" are formed as the liquid moves down the glass after being swirled or having been drank. The appearance is different than lacing from a beer as legs appear as long drooping lines and lacing (as you know) resembles lace-y material and appears more like dried foam.


7

As I understand it, this term comes from the wine world, where it refers to the patterns the glycerine makes on the inside of the glass. Glycerine (glyceryl alcohol or glycerol) is decidedly thicker than ethanol or water, so it forms a clear syrupy ring from which droplets or streamers trail down toward the surface of the beverage. Here's an image of leggy ...


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an american milk stout maybe a sour beer. Brett beers, but brett, may eat some of the sweetner or convert them into unknowns....with weird flavors....(recently i found out brett ferments lactose and some hop compounds.) Im sure there are others, but those are the ones that came to mind.


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You want your beer to be hoppy-fresh... Unfortunately, hoppy profile fades away with time. I'm not sure at what rate, but trust me, there is a difference in freshly brewed IPA (brewery fresh) vs the 1 or 2 month old. If you save couple of bottles for the future, you can compare. So, usually when you look at the recipes, it says to dry-hop it in last 5-7. ...


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How are you planning to introduce the stevia? Are you growing the plant and plan to extract yourself, buying it as a sweetner, etc? If dried, then place in a hop bag with a lighter ale or lager in secondary and/or kegging. If fresh, then place fresh leaves in container with vodka for 36hrs to extract. Can either cook (but not boil) liquid to condense or ...


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I would try a stout, make it dryer than you usually would, and then add a little to sweeten it back to a balanced level. Equally if you ever find you have an over attenuated beer that is lacking the balancing sweetness, you may try adding a little.



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