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18

Newcastle is a Northern English Brown ale. It has a pale ale malt base with some caramel malts. It also has small amounts of darker malts like chocolate to provide color and the nutty flavor. They also use English hop varieties for bittering, flavor and aroma. It is drier, cleaner, less fruity, and slightly hoppier than the Southern English Brown. ...


14

English brewers, brewing beer for the Russian Czar's court brewed a beer with a high ABV to try and impress the royalty of Russia. Lots of hops were added to balance the malt, and survive the journey to russia. This was the original Russian Imperial Stout. As will all things, American Craft breweries have now taken this name to put a spin on any beer that ...


10

I always recommend an Ale of some kind. For a beginner beer I always want to advise something that is a little simpler so that the beginner will have a better chance of success. I want them to keep brewing! So, I would stay away from lagers, as they often require more equipment to keep cool. I also would stay away from sour beers as they can be more ...


10

OK, you asked me to leave it as an answer, so here it is: In this order: 1. It's cold. 2. It's got alcohol. 3. It's got enough sugar to go well with Wheaties or is neutral enough to work with Froot Loops. Basically, that means just about anything. 4. Lightly hopped. Hops are tough on morning mouth. But then again, the antibacterial properties in hops ...


8

I would suggest a porter as your first beer (assuming it is a style that you like). There are a few reasons for this suggestion. Porter is an ale and ales are going to be easier than lagers due to equipment requirements. A porter is going to have a fairly simple recipe/grain bill. Fewer variables to work with mean fewer chances to go wrong. The chocolate ...


8

For me, a good breakfast beer is something I can handle in the morning, or with a hangover. While strong is fine, if I can taste alcohol, it's not going to end well. Mkeller's beer geek breakfast, for example, has too strong an alcohol taste to be a good breakfast stout. I think something malty with smooth flavors works best. Bitter hops just won't do at ...


8

"Farmhouse Ales" (Markowski, Brewers Publications) confirms that traditionally saison – while, yes, brewed in the winter or spring and needing to keep until the summer – obtained what preservation they did have from hops, not alcohol. It also mentions that sourness was an accepted part of saison (and in fact many beer styles :) until relatively recently. ...


7

Wouldn't this cause bottle bombs or be cloyingly sweet? No. Honey, like any other sugar added to the primary or secondary, will ferment out completely with enough time. Just make sure the beer is fermented to fullness before bottling. Honey is pretty much 100% fermentable, so if you are going to add it to secondary, you should take a gravity reading ...


7

What was the starting gravity and ending gravity? Did you confirm that fermentation had completed before bottling? 6g/litre should give around 2.5 volumes of CO2, depending on the final temperature of the beer, according to this tool. That's about right for a Belgian ale. I think your problem is most likely that you bottled the beer before it had finished ...


7

Like fire.eagle said, I think the BJCP style guideline is what you are looking for. This is what nearly all home brew competitions use when judging beer. You can also look at the Great American Beer Festival's style guidelines. They break beers out into more categories than the BJCP.


6

Brown bottles are you best bet, they block the most amount of skunkyness causing UV. There is no benefit to using a clear or green bottle other than you might already have them hanging around, and people might feel like they're drinking a certain style beer if you serve it in the bottle.


6

What's your favorite style of beer? As long as it's not something involved like a Lambic, or a fruit beer or something with a million adjuncts you should be fine. Look for a recipe or ingredient kit for a style that you like that has a small amount of ingredients (malt extract, 1 or 2 kinds of hops, maybe an adjunct or two) and you should be good to go, ...


6

This is actually a popular argument. Consensus is that fractional freezing still makes it a beer. Bud Ice, Miller Icehouse, and Natural Ice are all examples of ice beers, made the same way, and sold as beers. There's no standard definition of beer that limits the strength, so I see no reason why it's not beer.


6

The BJCP Guidelines give recommended hopping levels for most styles. The amount of bitterness is expressed as International Bittering Units (IBU). The IBU rating for a beer is a function of: quantity of hops, bitterness of hops (alpha acid percentage), boil time, and gravity and volume of wort. There are lots of good IBU calculators on the web. Google for ...


6

The only consideration that comes into bottle choice really is serving size and glass strength due to carbonation levels. (Some highly carbonated styles see thicker glass for safety reasons.) Then there is bottles that will accept corks. Across all the different styles I've encountered in corked bottles I can't say its specific to any style. Again you see ...


5

Brew Your Own recently did a feature on the Gose (Gosebier) style. You can find the full article here as well as the all-grain and extract with grain recipe's. I have copied the all grain recipe here: There She Gose Again (5 gallons/19 L, all-grain) OG = 1.048 FG = 1.012 IBU = 12 SRM = 4 ABV = 4.7% Ingredients: 5 lbs. (2.3 kg) ...


5

It is part marketing and part tradition. The term has origins in high gravity and hopped porters exported from England. The BJCP has this to say about the Russian Imperial Stout: Brewed to high gravity and hopping level in England for export to the Baltic States and Russia. Said to be popular with the Russian Imperial Court. Today is even more ...


5

For most people brewing a Saison is a great summer compatible beer to brew. The saison yeast works best at 80F. And the flavor of saison is often citrusy and light. You can brew a saison to a variety of OGs for different levels of enjoyment. You can make a session style saison or a bigger version to pair well with food. Check out this BJCP link to Saison. ...


5

Belgian beers are usually cited as being "digestible". That means they have a light body that makes them easy to drink. Most Belgian beers you brew should have around 20% sugar to achieve that. Don't get taken in by the Belgian candi sugar rocks at the brew store. Belgian brewers don't use it. Corn or table sugar works just fine, and if you want a ...


5

Back in about 1971,I found a recipe for homebrew in an alternative newspaper called the San Jose (CA) Redeye. Without a doubt, this kit (and kaboodle)was cheap. A 10 gallon plastic waste basket was the primary fermenter. SaranWrap was the "lid". The most expensive component was a hydrogemeter, which may not have been needed, but added a bit of weird science ...


5

Well, technically, you can only lose up to 3 points for appearance. However, as people "drink with their eyes", I think you'd struggle to do well amongst other witbiers in the category, assuming it's not disqualified up front for being entered out of style. I'd personally enter it as a specialty beer and give enough info that hopefully the judges would ...


4

As a general rule, any ale is easier than brewing a lager: it takes less time, and can ferment at room temperature. Also, the smaller the number of ingredients the easier it is too, so that rules out anything with ingredients that need to prepared (ground up), steeped, or added the fermenter. A basic Amber or Pale would be the easiest, I think.


4

I would suggest with a more "normal" style of beer (don't start with a Barleywine or Double-IPA) My first beer was a partial mash IPA and it turned out pretty well. I also did some partial mash cream ales early on too. Having said that, my first batch of all grain was a Belgium Tripple and it was a great beer. The most important thing to think about when ...


4

The definition varies, depending on who you ask (and usually upon their tolerance to alcohol and frequency with which they drink). But it means you should be able to have a couple and go back to work functioning perfectly well, or several over the course of a day without getting more than a little buzzed. In my opinion, it should be less than 5%, but my ...


4

Southern English Brown is mildly sweet and Porter can be fairly dry and and roasty. I think it matters upon the substyle of Porter one is looking at. Robust Porter is the substyle most people are familiar with and I view it very different in flavor and composition that a Southern English Brown. If I was forced to draw the line to bend my thoughts to your ...


4

I found this today... http://hopwild.com/2009/08/21/allday-beer-gose-recipe/comment-page-1/


4

"Belgian character" comes from yeast, so as long as you use any Belgian strain (i its optimal temperature!), you don't need any special things to do.


4

Ferment at the recommended temperature until terminal gravity is achieved, and then lager at near freezing temperature. If you bring the temp down to 50 F. Before terminal gravity is reached the mostly likely outcome is a stalled fermentation.


4

My local homebrew shop sold me a complete starter kit for about $65 plus tax. I ordered a brew kettle from Northern Brewer for $38 and a few extract kits ($35-50/each). That's pretty close to your range. My suggestion is to at least visit your local shop (if you have one) and chat with the owner. It's a good way to get some valuable advice and maybe plug ...


4

Do you have access to millet? That's a very close sub for sorgum. This might not sound appealing, but millet is usually available in pet stores as bird food. Looking around, i spotted a few recipes on homebrewtalk.com for Rwandan banana beer, and a few folks used Oats instead of millet or sorgum, so that seems like a good sub as well, and certainly ...



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