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7

Batch Size is how much you package. Think of it like cooking, when creating a recipe your not shooting for so many cups of batter.. you want to know how many pancakes. example: I boil 7 Gallons (Pre-Boil Vol) I end up with 6 Gallons (Post Boil Vol) I ferment 5.5 Gallons I then put 5 Gallons in my Keg. This process makes a 5 gallon batch.


5

Fermenting in a the free 5 gallon bottles you can get will work fine - after all that's pretty much what Better Bottle PET Carboys are. Compared to the 2-2.5 gallons of headspace you get in a bucket fermentor, the 1 gallon that you're leaving isn't much, especially for a high gravity beer like a RIS, so be sure to use a blowoff tube rather than an airlock. ...


4

I regularly do 10gl batches in a 15.5gl keggle. You will definitely need to attend to the kettle while bringing it up to a boil to prevent boil-overs, but it's certainly possible. Also, foam-control agents (Fermcap-S, simethicone/baby gas drops) will help, but are not fool-proof prevention. One thing to note: you need a lot fewer BTUs to maintain a boil ...


3

I have 15.5gl "keggles" as my HLT and BK. I think I've only done one 5gl batch in it, but yours should work fine as a boil kettle. Though you might have some non-trivial deadspace to work around, just adjust your volumes to compensate or look into a dip tube to minimize deadspace. While that false bottom seems to sit very high for mashing a 5gl batch, I'm ...


3

The ideal keg size for a 23l batch is 23l or as close as you can get above that. You can use a larger capacity keg with no problems, but you will end up using more CO2, since you have to pressurize a larger volume. Using smaller kegs is also possible, but a bit of a pain since you have twice the work to do cleaning, sanitizing and filling, and again, the ...


3

When I'm brewing I typically think about what volume is going into the fermenters more than anything further down the line. This usually directly relates to what goes into the keg or into bottles but depends greatly on losses later in the process. To twist dana's excellent example (and to be clear I do not completely disagree with his definition) when you ...


2

Wood barrels should be full or they will leak. The dry areas may open up allowing contamination from the air. To prevent oxidation when racking to barrels the hydrating / sanitizing fluid is purged from the barrel with c02, so there is no oxygen exposure at all when racking to the barrel. This is good practice with any secondary. Barrel still needs to be ...


2

In theory a 11g packet contains 220 billion cells, which should do fine for an 18 liter batch. 23 is not such a big difference, so I am sure you are not in any major risk area. With re-hydration you should be good. I am sure that, with the rousing, your beer will get closer to panned FG. Note that, when rousing the yeast bed you will also stir up a lot of ...


2

The main thing you need to consider is the boil-kettle in terms of size, because of boil off. For example, you want a 9 or 10+ gallon boil kettle for 5 gallon all-grain batches if you're doing a full boil, because you will have boil-off and generally want to start with around 7 gallons of water, and will want some room in the pot above the water line. 7 ...


1

Your thinking is correct. Even with one day that extra surface area will oxidize your beer. A better option for a partially sized batch would be oak cubes or chips in a normal carboy/fermentor. Save the barrel for a full 5 gallon batch. A good practice is to brew more than 5 gallons to be sure you can nearly fill it. Or to brew 5 gallons slightly ...



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