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15

2-row: Favored by European brewers Lower protein content Yields greater theoretical extract Tend to be more uniform in kernel size (better for less-sophisticated mills) 6-row: Grows better in the U.S. and is cheaper, so used by big domestic breweries More enzymes and husks help with adjunct cereals (so good for e.g. an oatmeal stout) Higher protein ...


9

Taste wise you're going to get a slightly more grainy flavor out of 6 row. Biologically 6 row has more diastic power and is better used for converting starchy adjuncts. You also will get about 2ppg more out of 6 row than you will 2 row. But quite frankly, today's 2 row is well modified and has enough diastic power to convert a large amount of starchy ...


5

I received a couple hundred pounds of free base malt a few years ago and used it in a lot of different styles of beer. What I found is that it did fine in beers that had a higher percentage of specialty grains or was less malt focused. Styles like American barley wine, American Stout, IPA, and Blond ales it seemed to work well because it just needed to ...


4

I've been using both for a long time and I don't think there's any more difference between Belgian and German malts than there is between maltsters in the same country. I interchange them at will, although these days I mainly use Best pils malt (German) for both German and Belgian styles. I think it's the best tasting pils malt of all I've tried, and I ...


3

Like Tobias said, corn is made mostly of starch and lack any enzymes which can convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Since you are asking for stove top, I am going to assume DME/LME and the corn will just be your adjunct. However, if you are just going for corn, you will just need a lot of it. So back to your question! Yes, you can does this on stove ...


2

Pick a style of beer that is balanced more toward malt than hops -- a highly hopped IPA is going to hide a lot of the malt flavor. Something like an ordinary or special Bitter, Scottish ales, blond ale, or many of the lagers will give much more malt flavor. American Ale yeast (Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001) tend to be very neutral, as do some of the ...


2

Brewing is a lot like cooking. You can't often try ingredients in isolation - you wouldn't normally eat pure salt, pepper, chili, vinegar etc... the taste would be far more potent than it would normally be. But combined with some other ingredients (meat, fish, tomatoes etc..), they become wonderful with something else to play off. The same is true with ...


2

2 row is a variety of barley grain, as distinguished from 6 row. Pilsner malt refers to the killing process applied to the grain. To make things confusing, some maltsters market a "2 row" product. In my experince, this is a more generic malt than what is sold as "pale malt" or "pilsner malt". Visit your maltster's website to see the quantitative differences ...


2

Prairie Malt is a fairly standard 2-row, and should not add too much flavor. While I've never tried it myself, you can totally try eating, or sucking on a few of the raw kernels, and see if you can identify the flavor that's bothering you. If it's not that, maybe describe the off-flavor in more detail? It could still be part of your process (equipment ...


2

I generally agree with most of the recommendations, but I would shy away from a lot of the hops choices, especially Fuggles. It has an earthy, woody flavor that could conflict. I'd recommend a small bittering addition using a very neutral hop like Magnum with no other hops. Also, if you just want to learn the flavor of grains, it's easy to make a tea with ...


1

You will want to use a neutral yeast and ferment at the lower end of the temperature range for that yeast. Probably the best bet is WLP001, Wyeast 1056 or Safale US-05. These yeasts all contribute minimal phenols and esters, and allow grain and hops to shine. For hops, I would suggest a noble variety, such as saaz, tettnang, or Fuggles. Use only a ...


1

I keep 600-1K lb. of malt on hand usually. For American styles, Rahr pale is my standard. For German or Belgian styles, my standard base is Best pils. For darker German styles, it's Best Munich. I've experimented with many different malts over the years and these have become my favorites. I don't use Maris Otter since I don't brew British styles and I ...



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