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7

I always use this hop substitution chart, but there are others available too. According to it, Horizon and Newport are substitutions for Magnum. Galena, Nugget, and Fuggle are substitutions for Newport, so you could try that too. Finally, it lists Magnum as a substitute for Columbus, which might be easier to find. The BYO chart suggests Northern ...


4

Not a problem. I've done that before and it had no negative effects.


3

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...


3

Rousing the yeast and fermenting at warmer temperatures will speed fermentation. However, particularly with a barley wine -- where there are a lot of sugars present -- it can take more than a week for fermentation complete. If the gravity continues to go down, my advice is to leave it alone. If the gravity stops changing over the course of several days, ...


3

According to the BJCP, both English and American styles of barleywine should have low to moderate levels of carbonation, depending on age and conditioning. BJCP Category 19 Of course, it's your beer, drink it you would like, but that's what the style guide says and most if not all commercial examples of barleywine are carbonated.


3

Magnum and Columbus hops produce very different results. Magnum is a low cohumulone hop, which results in a very smooth bitterness. Columbus is relatively high cohumulone and will give a much sharper bitterness. Horizon is my usual sub for Magnum. As to a BW not featuring hops, it really depends on what style of BW you're making. English BW are subdued ...


2

There are advantages/disadvantages to each. Aging in bulk will minimize the oxidation that will occur (all other things being equal) as it has less surface area. Some level of oxidation can be considered a benefit in a barleywine, but it can go too far. So I think if you are looking at keeping a barleywine for a very long time, it is best to do the primary ...


2

I personally don't think that natural carbonation or yeast in the bottle have much of anything to do with beer maturation upon cellaring. Yeast obviously plays a critical role in flavor development while making the beer and carbonating it. But I have never heard someone really say that force carbed beer and bottle conditioned beer tasted different. When ...


2

Yes, mashing for longer than 12 hours may not be good for the beer, particularly if the temperature is allowed to drop during that time. (As anyone who has left a mash for that length of time and taken a sniff will confirm!) In this case with so much grain you could safely go for a 2 or 3 hour mash, to be sure of complete conversion. since the water to ...


2

You don't want a BW to finish at too low a final gravity. The 1.025 it's at right now is just about perfect. But it's really hard to say what's going on without knowing your recipe, techniques,and OG.


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


1

Sometimes, when I mash too long (more than 90 minutes), I get a stuck-mash. Its as if my grain bed gels-up, like pudding or cold oatmeal. I have found that using rice-hulls or a more coarse grind can help reduce the effect. If you do an iodine test (with idophor) you can determine if the conversion is done. Once it is done, waiting any longer won't make ...


1

1.060 will make a perfectly acceptable beer (albeit not a barley wine), BUT your bitterness to gravity ratio will be way off. The perceived bitterness of a beer is dependent on the starting and finishing gravities. A high gravity beer finishes sweeter than a low gravity beer, and that sweetness reduces the perceived bitterness. If you hopped the beer with ...


1

You can't (shouldn't) go back to the mash tun after the boil. My guess is that you would get some tannins instead of more sugar. As for why you got a lower OG, perhaps it was something on your mash? - Grains crushed too coarsely? - Mash temperature? - Mash style (batch vs fly?) Since by now you are probably already on the fermentor, there are only 2 ...


1

Typically speaking it's best to age in the bottle, not out. Bottle once fermentation is complete and the beer has cleared out, same as always. However you want to let it stay in the bottle much longer than your standard brew before consumption; around 6 months is standard. Reason for that is because there are hot alcohols and (if you're brewing american ...



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