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11

The ester you're experiencing is called isoamyl acetate. Esters don't contribute to hangovers. I had a banana flavor crop up in my very first batch, an extract IPA. It happened in the bottle, as best I could tell. I tasted the beer between primary and secondary, and before bottling, and there was no hint of this flavor. Everything I read pointed toward ...


8

Seeing that you used an English Ale yeast, then the most likely answer is that you fermented too hot. Some restrained fruity esters are expected in nearly every ale, and the english ales definitely have them... banana is a bit unlikely one, and is usually only in styles like hefeweizens and tripels. Next time try lowering your fermentation temps to closer ...


3

I'm not sure about this, but I've been operating for a long time under the impression that unwanted banana (estery) aromas in general are a sign that the yeast was stressed-- either due to a hot fermentation, lack of oxygen or just plain having to work too hard. By the latter, I mean that perhaps you didn't use enough yeast for either the volume of beer or ...


3

It's certainly possible that the banana esters are due to warm fermentation temperature. After sanitation, I'd argue that the most important step in brewing is fermentation temperature. You want both the correct temperature for your yeast (each yeast varies so check the manufacturer), and a consistent temperature. The method you mentioned helps primarily ...


2

It can be done, as Seth pointed out when referencing Wells' offering. I don't know if you'd want to mash them, though, or if you'd just add them to the secondary. Bananas have a very strong flavor, especially ones that are flecked with brown. If you're going to try it, maybe you could also infuse some nut flavor and make a proper Bluth Banana Stand Ale.


2

I'm not sure about when you would want to include them in the process, but Wells makes a Banana Bread Beer, so it can definitely be done. I also came across this article about a Hefeweizen mixed with banana nectar, like a banana version of the Austrian Radler, so you might be able to try incorporating it at the end of your brew somehow.


2

Would placing the fermenter tank in a tub of water be a good way to handle hot environments? I started brewing extracts a couple of months ago and I started to do the "swamp cooler" method which sounds similar to that which you have postulated. The only difference is that I never replace the water. I would recommend using a outer bucket filled with water ...


1

I agree with others; I think your fluctuating temperature is the likely cause. I have never tried the swamp method but I am about to convert a refrigerator into a fermentation chamber. I have a temperature control unit I picked up on ebay from someone in Hong Kong - the unit name escapes me at the moment. I am going to by-pass the thermostat on the fridge ...


1

I've used bananas while brewing before. In my experience, it's hard to get any flavor out of them. Fermented bananas, don't leave much banana flavor. This is very similar to how wine, doesn't really taste like grapes. If you just want the flavor from them (and not the fermentable sugars) here's what I'd suggest. I'd mash & sanitize them.. put ...


1

Sounds yummy :) I might boil the mashed 'nanners with some water to sterilize them first. Raw fruit can harbor beer-spoiling bacteria. If not boil, at least hold at pasteurizing temps for a time. According to MicroMatic, for beer... The process involves running the package through a hot water spray (approximately 140 degrees F) for two to three ...


1

I've made a banana beer before. Lots of bananas & some brown sugar. It didn't taste like bananas (except a faint hint after swallowing). It tasted like a lo-dollar asti spumanti & ±13% (ok, so quite a bit of brown sugar). As close as I recall, 10 lb bananas, 5 lb brown sugar, 2 lb Munich malt (to do the starch conversion & give a whisper of that ...


1

Anytime I add fruit, I put it in the secondary after primary fermentation so the yeast is gentler on the fruit leaving more of the fruit flavor behind. I'll usually give the beer a week in the secondary before I add the fruit. Banana is a fantastic idea though, you guys have me excited. I'm going to try this out.


1

There are a couple of reasons your beer might have a banana aroma and tart taste. The main answer is "esters". You can get esters because of a hot fermentation (over 75˚ or so), or also because of a lack of oxygen in the wort during fermentation (low aeration). The flavor might go down a little over time, but probably not too much.



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