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10

Bacteria and Yeast are not related in any genetic sense. Yeast, by and large, eat sugar and produce alcohol and various esters and phenols (and CO2). To most brewers (and vintners), though, the only yeast of any consequence is Saccharomyces, and any other microbe is to be avoided at all costs. Brettanomyces is another yeast genus, which typically ...


6

No, it is not necessary. In fact, many argue that it's much better to not heat it, as pasturizing the honey often time strips the honey of it's aroma & heat-sensitive aromatics. I would add the unfermented cider and the honey and stir it like crazy with sanitized spoon or other mixing device. Much like the "no-heat" meadmaking method. This will ...


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


4

If you're doing 2.5 gallon boils, and then adding another 2.5 gallons of (say) 55F tap water, then you're final temperature will be around 133F - the mid point of 212 and 55. For ales, pitching temperature is recommended at 75F, so you'll need to leave the wort for a few hours to naturally cool, or submerse in an ice bath to accelerate the cooling. If ...


3

A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state ...


3

I didn't know this until pulling up Wikipedia, but yeast is part of the Fungi Kingdom, whereas bacteria are part of the (go figure) Bacteria Kingdom. I know it's not a terribly informative answer, but it indicates that even though they're both single-celled organisms they are very significantly different.


3

Safe answer is to boil every bit of water that touches your fermenter. But that's sometimes overkill. If you have a well like I do, follow the boil rule. Even if the well water checks out clean, they're only looking for coliform, not other things, and even though I have a UV sterilization unit to kill bacteria, there is no residual sanitizing effect in ...


2

It sounds like you asking not so much about is it ready to bottle as far as being done fermenting, but what are the little white spots. I had a friend who's first batch did the same thing. This is what I did as I have never seen it before either. I got my racking cane (sanitized) and with the little black end that keeps it out of the sediment, scooped a bit ...


2

Bacteria and Yeast exist in different kingdoms of the classification system we use for living things. The primary difference is that bacteria are Prokaryotes, while yeast (fungi) are eukaryotes. If you really want to knock yourself out here is the difference between the pro- and the eukaryotes.


2

Different microorganisms vastly change the result of a fermentation. I would argue that the strain of yeast you use usually has a greater effect on the character of the beer than anything else. Bacteria that could infect your beer, especially coliforms and lactobacilli, produce acid that sour your beer (ever wonder where malt vinegar comes from?).


2

There are two issues that need to be addressed before it's safe to use tap water. First, your water is likely chlorinated. Aside from possibly affecting the yeast, this almost always results in a chlorophenol flavor (think bandaid smell). The chlorine reacts with chemicals in the hops to form the chlorophenol. To fix this, make sure you carbon filter ...


2

Because you're adding water before the fermentation starts you're probably fairly safe, especially if you live where you can get city water. If you have a well you might want to test your water, but generally speaking, if you like the taste of your tap water (and you don't get sick drinking it), it should be good enough for your beer.


2

I've visited one particular brewery (not SN; this one will remain un-named) that used open fermentation, with dubious results. Judging from the open-fermentation room, their sanitation was subpar, with mold an funk on the walls. Not good. The beer reflected that, with heavy pediococcus infection in every single batch. That's not to say it can't be done, ...


2

It's true, the bacterial cultures in your mouth would not be "used-to" the high alcohol content, and most importantly the acidic environment of your beer. However, make no mistake about the fact that you did contaminate your beer!!!! You will most likely see no difference in taste, however you may find that the beer doesn't age as well, the storage time may ...


1

I don't think this will make it easier for anaerobic bacteria - they are not really affected by the presence or lack of oxygen, and since there is little food available I doubt they would propagate anyway. I don't think it will do any harm, but you may want to try harvesting two jars yeast at the same time both with and without a vacuum to see if there ...


1

If it doesn't taste off, well... Maybe it's just hop residue? You have a ton of hops in there. No telling how tight those bag walls held-up. I believe that I've noticed something similar when I've brewed IPAs, and have added pellet hops straight to the fermenter, without the use of hop bags. Sometimes the pellets will sink, but (like in my last batch) ...


1

The best way to tell for sure is to wait. You can't fix the problem if you have one. You just finished primary fermentation: it's not uncommon to have left over yeast all over the place; you haven't cleared your wine yet, whether with time or chemicals. You can also see many images of others' infections via Google images. If the flowers are just starting to ...


1

I don't know where djr obtained his information to say "Crystallized honey is more likely to spoil (ferment)". Honey will only ferment if it is robbed from the hives before the bees have ripened /dried it to less than 18 percent moisture. Commercial bee keepers wreck their honey of it's enzymes by heating it in order to kill the spores which only become ...


1

You can certainly use an open-fermentation vessel to ferment. Brewing TV did an episode on Open Fermentation, and the tasting notes. The taste of your beer will change with an open fermentation but that doesn't mean it isn't a great method. You will still need to properly clean and sanitize your equipment, however, as you'll still need to have sanitized ...



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