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12

Hop aroma will dissipate over time. I found that dry hopping just as fermentation was ending (primary vessel, no secondary) resulted in losing most of the aroma over the next 1-2 weeks, but the room smelt great. I'd suggest: More hops. Don't leave them in so long. Try 3 or 4 days before you bottle. Longer times might also result in unwanted grassy or ...


11

The ester you're experiencing is called isoamyl acetate. Esters don't contribute to hangovers. I had a banana flavor crop up in my very first batch, an extract IPA. It happened in the bottle, as best I could tell. I tasted the beer between primary and secondary, and before bottling, and there was no hint of this flavor. Everything I read pointed toward ...


8

There may be a bit of tasting elitist that goes with smelling before tasting, but in my experience smell, aroma, and most importantly, oxygen is key to getting the full taste/experience. I'm not talking about smelling it, setting it back on the table, commenting to your buddy how you detect hints of cherries, then picking it back up and taking a big swallow ...


8

http://bayareabrewing.com/category/homebrew/10/ Theory A hopback is a sealed chamber into which you put whole leaf hops. Hot wort exits the kettle, passing through the hopback before chilling. Like whirlpool additions, the hops contribute volatile aroma compounds that would normally evaporate in the boil. The leaf hops also filter hot break, helping to ...


8

Seeing that you used an English Ale yeast, then the most likely answer is that you fermented too hot. Some restrained fruity esters are expected in nearly every ale, and the english ales definitely have them... banana is a bit unlikely one, and is usually only in styles like hefeweizens and tripels. Next time try lowering your fermentation temps to closer ...


7

For some hands on learning with less effort required than brewing several SMASH batches, you can dry hop some bland beer as explained here. I did not write that nor have I tried it yet but it looks like an interesting experiment.


5

Try using more hops. 1 oz. is really not a lot for dry hopping an IPA. If you're going for that west coast grapefruit/fruity hop aroma then Amarillo hops will be more suited as their aroma/flavor is much more intense. Try using a yeast that's going to accentuate the fruitiness of the hops. Dry notty yeast has almost no flavor/aroma, which can be desirable ...


5

Considering that hops are from the same family (Cannabaceae) as marijuana and hemp, that's not as outrageous as it may seem. Summit hops in particular, have an intensely 'weedy' aroma. I had an all Summit IPA shortly after the hop was introduced and it smelled (and tasted a bit) like bong water.


5

Yes, the wavelengths generated by a standard incandescent fit within those that are known to "skunk" beer, a process that is a photochemical reaction that causes specific chemical bonds to change, resulting in flavenoids (flavors) that are generally distasteful. They emit about one third to one half of the intensity of sunlight in the <500 nm range that ...


5

An biology take on it: Aroma: Perceived through your nose Flavor: Mostly perceived through your tongue although the aroma also helps your brain on forming the overall impression (think how things taste 'bland' when your have a flu and your nose is blocked)


5

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: ...


4

I wasn't aware that Fullers made an IPA. I couldn't find it at the Fullers website. Fullers being a UK based brewery I'd suggest looking into East Kent Goldings hops, and Fuggles hops. Both are UK varieties used in many English style ales.


4

Italy's Birra del Borgo do a range of beers that are made with tobacco. I don't know how they do it, but I have had the KeTo RePorter and the KeTo ReAle and can say that they genuinely taste like they have tobacco in them. The KeTo ReAle left my mouth feeling like I'd had a cigar... You could always drop them an email and ask how they use the leaves. ...


4

MBT (more often referred to as skunking or light-struck) is an off-putting flavor and aroma characteristic that is intuitively named after the animal which is well known for dispensing what is considered to be the Satan's post-apocalyptic butthole of all off-flavors. The chemical composition and odor of MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) is very similar to ...


3

Of course, you can use anything in beer but that doesn't mean it's a good idea. Keep in mind that tobacco is poisonous when ingested.


3

You can get more malt flavour and aroma to come through by substituting some of the base malt with munich. Similar to no-sparge, partigyle brewing will create a rich malty brew from the first runnings, but you get better utilization of the grain compared to no-sparge, since there is also the second runnings. Other alternatives: add chlorides (50-100ppm) ...


3

No-sparge is one approach, the lack of sparge creates richer malt flavors. Another is to use malts that boost malt aroma: Aromatic Malt, Melanoidin Malt, etc. Decoction Mashing can boost malt flavors, although I've never tried it. And some yeast strains are better than others at producing maltiness. I recently did a split batch of four English yeast strains ...


3

In winemaking, we can eliminate excess sulfur a few different ways. Ones that come to mind that might work for beer are: Splash rack: rack your beer into another carboy. set the end of the siphon hose high up into the receiving vessel so that the beer runs down the wall of the carboy. You typically avoid this because you don't want to oxidize the beer, ...


3

Too much oil from real nuts, IMO. I'd say to get some hazelbut extract and use that. You'll have to titrate it in a little at a time to get to where you want to be. Pour yourself 12oz and drop it in, mixing and stirring as you go. When the balance seems right do the math for how many 12oz there is in your whole batch , then add that many drops more to the ...


3

If you're not drinking beer for the smell, you're missing out. Hops provide bitterness, flavor and aroma. I love the smell of a good IPA, just as much as the flavor. Aroma adds a dimension to beer, and can also change the way it tastes (usually for the better). To take your analogy further, consider the aroma as DVD extras. Sure you can just watch the ...


3

"Many aromatics in beer are quite volatile and tend to dissipate rapidly. Quickly sniff a beer after it’s poured to detect these. Also note how the aroma changes over time." This is from the article written by Gordon Strong (BJCP President) on Beer Evaluation for the Homebrewers Association. To read the full article ...


3

I'm not sure about this, but I've been operating for a long time under the impression that unwanted banana (estery) aromas in general are a sign that the yeast was stressed-- either due to a hot fermentation, lack of oxygen or just plain having to work too hard. By the latter, I mean that perhaps you didn't use enough yeast for either the volume of beer or ...


3

You could buy leaf-tobacco in bulk and home-smoke some grain with tobacco smoke. Nicotine's LD50 is pretty low, though. I would try to find combinations of ingredients to closely mimic the flavor, rather than using actual tobacco.


3

It could the the hops - some hops e.g. bramling cross have a clear blackcurrant aroma, or the use of a dark crystal, which can bring several different aromas, such as toasted biscuit, prunes, raisin and blackcurrant. When sugar solutions are frozen to make frozen deserts, crystals can spontaneously form. This could have happened in the wort, pulling out ...


3

In terms of the basic senses, flavor comes from the sense of taste, which is primarily from the tongue. There are 5 types of flavor the tongue can detect: sweet, sour, salt, bitter and savory (the last one is a relatively new discovery.) Our sense of smell can detect an almost infinite number of different smells, since a single smell is really a combination ...


3

A great way to learn the distinct flavors of hops/grains is SMaSH (Single Malt and Single hop) brewing. By using a single grain and a single hop you can really focus on one flavor at a time. So if you make a beer that is 100% cascade, you can expect to taste a flowery and spicy, grapefruit flavor. Once you get a feel for what that tastes like move on to a ...


3

I believe you are detecting the sulfur produced by the yeast. Hefe or Wit yeast in wheat beers can absolutely produce this compound, so its not unusual to encounter. I've had it appear a few times before, and I believe it fades out over time. I mostly keg, but I can recall getting strong sulfur production in a Hefe with WLP351, which was bottled and seemed ...


3

The smell is hard to describe, especially to someone who grew up where there are no skunks. It is not really useful for me to tell you it smells like skunk musk. I have heard some of those people describe it as the smell of burnt rubber, body odor combined with burnt popcorn, sour coffee, or certain strains of aromatic marijuana. You really have to try it ...


2

"Mr. Malty" offers an alternative to dry hopping with a large addition of late hops.


2

If you're looking for a big aroma rather than hop notes, I'd add more like 2-4 ozs depending on what you're looking for. IMO Cascades are great for dry hopping though.



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