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3

Based on my own experience, an 8 gal. kettle will barely work for a 5 gal. batch. Even at that, you might have to boil a concentrated wort and add top up water after the boil. Remember that in addition to accounting for trub and evaporation, you also need some headroom in there to start with. I wouldn't recommend anything less than 15 gal. for a 10 gal. ...


2

Well, it depends on the losses you assume along the way. For 5 gallons, if you assume a trub loss of 0.5 gallons, and evaporation loss of 1.0 gallon, then you would need 6.5 gallons of wort to get 5 gallons into a fermenter. If you follow the oft-quoted rule of thumb that you want minimum headspace in your kettle equal to one-third of your boil volume, that ...


3

As mentioned, BTUs are your primary issues. "Turkey Fryers" are very popular and kick out enough power. Side concerns would be storage. Gas bottles, burners and pots take up a LOT of space. Keep that in mind then purchasing the items. Gas bottles should not be stored indoors. Please follow COMMON SENSE and your local rules and regulations regarding the use ...


0

BTUs relate to fuel consumption, not necessarily the "power" of the burner.


4

Whoof... I would not recommend doing a full boil inside an apartment if you can possibly avoid it. You're basically putting a gallon or two worth of water into the air. Things will get muggy quite quickly. Presuming you can't get a natural gas hookup, you'll be restricted to butane burners; propane gives off too much carbon monoxide. Even with a butane ...


0

In my book "Experimental Homebrewing" we recommend blending the jar of PB2 with 6 oz. of 150 proof neutral grain spirits on brew day and storing it in a jar until the beer has fermented. When primary has finished, add the PB slurry to a sanitized container and rack the beer onto it. Let it age for a week, than rack and package the beer.


0

Water may be the problem, but I'd focus on some easier solutions first. Confirming mash temp with a second thermometer. Mashing a little thinner (1.5-1.75qt/lb)and cooler (145-149F). And I would strongly recommend repeating one of the same beers you've already made so you can compare the end result with a prior result. THIS IS VITAL otherwise you really ...


0

Your beer is almost certainly fine, and you don't need to do anything except fill the airlock with water, and attach it to the fermenter. The release of CO2 in the fermenting beer creates positive pressure within the fermenter, which will help keep out oxygen and spoilage organisms. After fermentation is complete, it's possible for gas and bugs to enter ...


-1

@derek.cormier and @bughunter are generally correct. You have a very good chance of everything being fine. Besides oxidation though, you also should consider possible infection of the brew by unwanted wild yeast or bacteria. A lot depends on how fast your ferment got started, and the presence of fruit flies and the like which spread wild yeast from ...


2

RDWHAHB. Your beer is probably fine. Gases generally flow out during primary fermentation, not draw in. If you want to leave the beer in primary for a while, put some water in the airlock. If you want to rack to secondary, rack. Now actually might be a good time to take a hydrometer sample. Taste the sample to convince yourself that your beer is OK.


4

Seal the beer off from oxygen as soon as possible. If you decide to use the airlock, use sanitized water only. If you have access to CO2, put a layer of the gas over your beer as soon as possible (then close it off). If you've achieved your desired final gravity and you don't need to let it sit in the fermenter any longer, you could also bottle it or keg it ...



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