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I'm doing an AG porter recipe. Historically, I have been dissatisfied with my porters - they come out thin... The answer to thin, as in mouth-feel, is normally in your malt bill, the yeast you choose and your mash thickness and temps. See here. Mash ph also plays a role, but it isn't the only contributing factor, and the ph is affected by the other ...


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In addition to what mdma stated. High ppm of calcium could give the finished beer a "mineral water" flavor, but this is appropriate in many styles. You may want to consider RO or distilled bottled water at least 50/50 with your filtered water. This will help with the pH and cut down on the Chloramine.


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It's impossible to say without knowing the recipe, and your existing water etc.. It could go either way, but I'd be inclined to say you'll be fine. It does sound more than we'd typically add to a 5 gallon batch, but I don't see what negative affects it will have, and it clearly did raise the pH over time which was the intent. To put some numbers to it, 5 ...


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Are you sure your looking at this correctly? doesn't beer smith use OG post boil? your looking at pre boil gravity? after you boil you should hit your target. never run extra water through the grain bed once your 2nd runnings get below 2 degrees plato/brix. you can wind up with tannin extracted from the grains. get yourself a handheld refractometer ...


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Why dont you do a 15' out. I mean after you add the fining agent at 15' pull a sample... cool it down... and measure the gravity. if its too high add some water to your kettle to adjust the gravity into your target. once you add the water boil for a few minutes then chill. I am also very curious on how you get 95%??? that has got to be one interesting ...


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1.5 gallon batch? You should fine. The higher grain to water ratio may result in a slightly high pH but you should still be well in the range for enzymes to do their work.


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If your brewhouse consitantly achieves 95% just use that setting in your recipe/brew software and it will cascade to the grains allowing you to reduce their wieghts to hit a target OG. This will mainly result in a reduction in the base malt, while keeping most specialty grains close to original weights. Or you can estimate by hand, if a recipe is calculated ...


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Here are a few recipes that you can look at for help: http://beersmithrecipes.com/searchrecipe?uid=&term=Weizen&submit.x=13&submit.y=9&sort=Best+Match&allgrain=1&rated=4


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i have created the recipe for you using captainbrew.com. You can view it here. You can clone the recipe and substitute Pale 2 row with DME, trying to keep the percentages.


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Under German purity law any beer labeled Weiss or Weizen must be at least 50% malted wheat in its grain bill. That it purely trivial for a homebrewer, do what your palate likes. Along with jsled, there's nothing like milling your grain on brewday to add to the experience, but a mill does have a pretty big initial investment. ($200 us) Try to find a Local ...


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It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...



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