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9

Some things I can think of to increase body: Milk stouts use lactose, or milk sugar, to increase perceived body and sweetness. Lactose is unfermentable by yeast and so passes to the finished beer. Dextrin malt (CaraPils, CaraFoam) will impart a nice bit of body without adding crystal-malt-flavor (something I don't like in stouts). Mash high. Try 156°+ for ...


8

This gunk is what's known as "trub", and it is proteins left over from the hot and cold breaks. The experiment conducted here: http://brulosophy.com/2014/06/02/the-great-trub-exbeeriment-results-are-in/ seems to show that it doesn't really matter whether it's included in the fermenter or not, but most people still remove it/don't add it.


7

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


6

Well you don't steep any grain "during the boil". But to avoid upsetting mash pH you can steep all your non mash required grains in the wort during runoff in the kettle before you start the boil. I routinely add my roasted and crystal malts to a grain bag and steep them this way when I make stouts. Another application of steeping malts is to actually make ...


6

Brewing textbooks I referred to universally state that the gap between the rollers of the mill needs to be much closer together for wet-milling. You don't mention making any adjustments, so I'll assume you didn't. Since the husk is made more elastic by conditioning, the dangers of pulverizing it with too tight a mill are eliminated, and in fact it may do a ...


3

It's impossible to say without knowing the recipe, and your existing water etc.. It could go either way, but I'd be inclined to say you'll be fine. It does sound more than we'd typically add to a 5 gallon batch, but I don't see what negative affects it will have, and it clearly did raise the pH over time which was the intent. To put some numbers to it, 5 ...


3

It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...


3

There is no particular reason I am aware of that normal fermentations for extract vs. all-grain brews should be different. Perhaps some examples that you've noticed might help? Fermentation time is mostly a function of yeast health, wort oxygenation levels, yeast pitch rate, the gravity of the beer, and temperature. While extract might generally have less ...


3

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of 0.96*(weight of grain). The 0.96 is a ratio, so if you use kg of grain, for every 1 kg of grain, you will lose 0.96 kg of water (~960 mL). If you use pounds, 1 ...


3

No diastatic power Means that this malt does not have the required enzymes to break down starches into sugars. In other words, you need to add some malt that has diastatic power in conjunction to make it work. The diastatic power is measured in Lintner degrees. It is estimated that you need a minimum 30°L in your mash to have sufficient diastatic ...


3

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First is stuck filtering. If your malt is dripping wet, but nothing comes from the filter, this is the case. See Preventing a Stuck Sparge for details how to deal ...


2

I made a Strawberry Saison last Summer and the 1lb/per gallon was a nice subtle flavor, but I think I may raise the to 1.5 pounds next time. Also, I used frozen strawberries which I gently crushed. Let them thaw a bit at the bottom of the secondary and then racked on top of them. The beer was able to use all of the fruit this way.


2

It all comes down to mash temp. Lower mash temps(145-148) will yield more fermentable sugars. Down side is you lower your mash efficiency and need to compensate with more grain or adjuncts. But you will have a substantially dry beer. Even with a iipa you should be able to hit 1.01.


2

I have this exact same problem and it started showing up when I went to all grain. Some of the BSG kits I've done use a steeping grain process where the grains are pre-milled and they all turned out great. My extract brews have also been great. In every case I've used the same water source (tap water)... From the first all-grain batch to my latest they have ...


2

The excess soot is from incomplete combustion of your propane (C₃H₈ + 5O₂ -> 3CO₂ + 4H₂O) is the complete combustion reaction. You need to increase the amount of oxygen, not propane. The flame should burn blue and non-luminescent. A yellow or orange flame indicates incomplete combustion and by products such as carbon monoxide (g) "CO" and solid carbon (s) ...


2

There are many causes of haze in beer. Here you're assuming that the haze is from the yeast, but it may be chill haze, which takes a long time to settle out, if at all. Take a sample of the beer and warm it to room temperature. If the haze disappears then you know it was chill haze.


2

The volume to use is the final volume you are aiming for in the fermenter; yes the post boil volume. Lovibond -> SRM °L = (SRM + 0.76) ÷ 1.3546


2

I have two very rough guesses. First, are there any points where you are boiling uncovered where you could change and cover the pot? Second, your boiler is 52l? Given how large that is I expect you're producing a lot of steam in the boiler due to its increased surface area. Try skipping the boiler, sparge back into your HLT instead of the boiler. Having ...


2

1.5 gallon batch? You should fine. The higher grain to water ratio may result in a slightly high pH but you should still be well in the range for enzymes to do their work.


2

If your brewhouse consitantly achieves 95% just use that setting in your recipe/brew software and it will cascade to the grains allowing you to reduce their wieghts to hit a target OG. This will mainly result in a reduction in the base malt, while keeping most specialty grains close to original weights. Or you can estimate by hand, if a recipe is calculated ...


1

I'm doing an AG porter recipe. Historically, I have been dissatisfied with my porters - they come out thin... The answer to thin, as in mouth-feel, is normally in your malt bill, the yeast you choose and your mash thickness and temps. See here. Mash ph also plays a role, but it isn't the only contributing factor, and the ph is affected by the other ...


1

In addition to what mdma stated. High ppm of calcium could give the finished beer a "mineral water" flavor, but this is appropriate in many styles. You may want to consider RO or distilled bottled water at least 50/50 with your filtered water. This will help with the pH and cut down on the Chloramine.


1

Not this one no diastatic power This means that there are no active enzymes. Or at least none that could create maltose, so even if you would create some wort-like liquid, it would not be good beer wort. It have enough starch, it just lack the power to make it usable for your yeast. But if you really want to Then you may simply buy alpha and beta ...


1

I don't think there was much you could do on the fermentation side to fix anything. I'd still have planned ferment it out, plan to dry hop it heavily to try and create a little more balance. Then I'd learn form the experience and get ready to re-brew the beer I wanted to brew. To limit your efficiency, you could sparge a little faster or ease up on the ...


1

Franklin P Combs and Atron Seige are completely correct with their suggestions. Google Brewers Best Milk Stout recipe. It's my favorite extract recipe and is nice and thick. It also uses lactose and maltodextrin. The ingredients for Brewer's Best Milk Stout are: Fermentables 3.3 lb. Special Dark LME 3.3 lb. Light LME .5 lb. Lactose .5 lb. ...


1

I've been doing a lot of research for my own purposes. Brutus 10 is the gold standard of making your own. http://homebrewacademy.com/brutus-10-build Or, if you don't want to weld, which is the one I'm probably going to do. http://www.aleiens.com/profiles/blogs/wallace-the-weldless-brew


1

The temperature is most critical for isomerisation of the alpha acids. 100C for 90 min results in the maximal conversion of alpha acids; The Handbook of Brewing 2nd Ed p209. The vigor of the boil is not a major factor. The book goes on to say that breweries operating at high altitude can struggle to get good isomerisation rates. Depending on the malt and ...


1

The technique may work, and in theory, provided good process handling, shouldn't pose any issues. Something to consider though is that grain contains on it many organisms, including lactobacillus and enterobacter. Without boiling neither of the organisms will be killed, and will also have been given time to grow in the wort during the mash. How well they ...


1

My biggest concern would be botulism. If I'm not mistaken, unboiled wort is a very fertile breeding ground for that stuff. Even if "crash cooled in a freezer" I'd worry that too much of that bad stuff would stick around.



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