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5

First, keep in mind that Mr. wizard is a commercial brewer and his answers come from that point of view. It may not be applicable to homebrewers. Using wheat may be about the only case where using a protein rest may be of benefit. But it'a not a given. There are still proteolytic enzymes left in the malt. Due to the high protein content of wheat, it can ...


5

The core question is … Why? Different ions lead to different perceived properties in the finished beer; for one example: higher concentrations of chloride emphasize malt character, whereas higher concentrations of sulfate emphasize hop character and dryness. When? Both in the mash and in the sparge water, mostly based on the ratio in volume, with some ...


4

The HLT (Hot Liquor Tank) interestingly isn't there to hold wort or anything with alcohol (liquor here is referring to a liquid being used in a process). It has a simple job: It holds and heats water to be used in the mash. You also add salts such as gypsum in the HLT. With 10 gallon batches, a 5 gallon HLT absolutely not big enough. That being said, the ...


4

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


4

With 2 pumps, you don't need to worry about gravity feed to the fermenter. Also, for 10 gal. of finished beer I'd recommend something bigger than a 10 gal. pot. That's about all the help I can give you since I've brewed 452 batches using a cooler and wouldn't think of doing it any other way.


4

You can make a flour from the grain, and follow any of the recipes listed here: http://brooklynbrewshop.com/themash/category/spentgrainchef/


3

Whether or not they're really necessary depends on the water you have and the beer you want to brew. You need to start by getting an analysis of your water. Some water districts provide all the info you need, but many of them don't. If not, an excellent resource is wardlab.com. Get test W-6. As the what the info means and how you need to adjust your ...


3

A good crush should keep the grain husks intact, since they will then filter out the flour and provide an efficient lauter. I also crush reasonably finely, which does produce some flour, but as long as the husks are intact you're good. I have a 3 roller mill - the sales pitch was that it doesn't pulverize the husks as much as a 2 roller. I've not used a 2 ...


3

Its two different options. You can either do the malt version or the extract version. Wheat Liquid Malt Extract is actually a mix (usually 50/50) of wheat malt and pils/2-row/pale malt, depending on the manufacturer.


2

The beer will probably be drier, since I imagine your final mash temperature was in the range of 140-145°F - lower mash temps produce drier beer since there is a greater portion of fermentables. You may also lose body, since the temperature is not optimal for alpha amylase, which produces body enhancing dextrins, and is also close to the protein rest, so ...


2

According to figures from the American Homebrewers Assoc. and retail groups, most homewbrewers brew with extract. All grain requires more time, equipment, and effort. Obviously, a lot of people feel it's worth it, but more people have constraints on time, money and space. For those people, extract is the only way they can brew.


2

I would say that it's not sufficient for 10 gallon batch unless you're happy refilling, 3-4 times. I brew 10 gallons and have a 20 gallon HLT which I fill to 18-19 gallons at the start of brewday, and use all of it. For a 10 gallon batch, many target 11-12 gallons into the fementor. This means a preboil volume in the order of 14-16 gallons depending upon ...


2

You could go a number of different routes. Homebrewing can be as complicated or as easy as you want it to be. You need 3 pieces of equipment: HLT, Mash Tun, Boil Kettle. For that price, I would get a large kettle (at least 11 gallons) with a ball valve. For mash tun, get a cooler and buy a conversion. HLT can be another 10 Gallon kettle with ball valve. ...


2

Pick a style of beer that is balanced more toward malt than hops -- a highly hopped IPA is going to hide a lot of the malt flavor. Something like an ordinary or special Bitter, Scottish ales, blond ale, or many of the lagers will give much more malt flavor. American Ale yeast (Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001) tend to be very neutral, as do some of the ...


2

Brewing is a lot like cooking. You can't often try ingredients in isolation - you wouldn't normally eat pure salt, pepper, chili, vinegar etc... the taste would be far more potent than it would normally be. But combined with some other ingredients (meat, fish, tomatoes etc..), they become wonderful with something else to play off. The same is true with ...


2

I generally agree with most of the recommendations, but I would shy away from a lot of the hops choices, especially Fuggles. It has an earthy, woody flavor that could conflict. I'd recommend a small bittering addition using a very neutral hop like Magnum with no other hops. Also, if you just want to learn the flavor of grains, it's easy to make a tea with ...


2

I'd suspect either a faulty thermometer that's reading deceptively low is to blame, or perhaps your mash water chemistry is really off and you aren't getting full conversion. For the former, check your thermometer in crushed ice-water to ensure that its reading 32F, and in boiling water to ensure its 212F. Don't be shocked if you can't get it to read 212F ...


2

"Continuously" is overkill, "Periodically" is more reasonable. In my experience there are many variables: the insulation of the mash tun and the ambient temperature are the most influential. I used to mash in a round 10-gallon cooler. When the ambient temperature was warm (70F+), and the mash volume was sufficiently large (4-5 gallons+), I found that the ...


2

I think the most important thing you need to accomplish is understanding your brewery. Begin by taking notes. Record the temperature every time you take it throughout the mash. But be sure that the temperature is uniform by stirring thoroughly, this can and will be a frustration for you. Over time, you'll have a better idea for how much temperature you'll ...


2

Sounds normal to me. When I was first reading up about BIAB, it was mentioned in several places that this is an issue. Absorbing 3/4 of 5 gallons seems like a bit much, but it will absorb some (I've heard about a quart per pound?). It probably didn't absorb that much, as the wort would drain out of the bag if you could hold it over the pot for 10-20 minutes. ...


2

You want to preserve the ratio of 2-row to Crystal 60L. Here is one simplified way to do the math. 2-Row has an average, theoretical extract yield of 1.036 specific gravity -- if you take the last two digits (36), you can express this as 36 gravity points per pound of grain per gallon of wort (PPG) at 100% efficiency. The recipe assumes a mash ...


1

Hulled barley is about 2% fat by weight. That's almost certainly why we see a slight oil-slick on the wort before it boils. I'm not sure why you don't see it when you're boiling inside. It could be like you say,that the rapid speed of the outdoor boil has something to do with it. Or it could be that the light is brighter outside, showing the oil more ...


1

I would focus on the yeast. How old were the yeast packs? Viability and cell count starts to drop off after just a few weeks. How big was the starter and what was the O.G.? Did you use a stir plate? There is a yeast calculator at Mr. Malty that I have found to be helpful. A stir plate helps quite a bit too. Make sure the temperature of your starter is near ...


1

Based on having done it myself, you will possibly have a burned, smoky flavor and not in a good way. Whether it's safe to drink depends at least partially on what the bag is made of. If the bag was muslin, it's likely safe. If it was nylon, I'd be more worried.


1

Hardness is only one component of water. You need to look at the full analysis to see what's causing it in order to know what to do about it. Then, use a water spreadsheet (I recommend Bru'nwater https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/) to calculate how to correct for it. Your fears about water additions are unfounded. If done correctly, no off flavors ...


1

I'd consider that within a reasonable margin of error. It will hardly affect your beer in a noticeable way. I wouldn't worry about it at all. In any case, that's pre boil. If you just boil a bit longer, you'll have slightly less beer but you'll be able to hit your intended OG. As to why it happened, there are any number of reasons for a minor thing like ...


1

Based on my experience, yes. Or rather, YES! You'd think that, with sufficient paddling, a uniform temperature should stay fairly uniform. I haven't found that to be the case. I'd hit (e.g.) the protein rest, stir the crap out of the mash, check and recheck the temp, and when I came back 10 or 15 minutes later it would be 10 degrees hotter in the middle, ...


1

You will want to use a neutral yeast and ferment at the lower end of the temperature range for that yeast. Probably the best bet is WLP001, Wyeast 1056 or Safale US-05. These yeasts all contribute minimal phenols and esters, and allow grain and hops to shine. For hops, I would suggest a noble variety, such as saaz, tettnang, or Fuggles. Use only a ...


1

It's simply a different technique. Batch sparging (filling up the mash tun and then draining) versus fly sparging (dripping water while simultaneously draining) is a long standing debate where folks like our own Denny Conn will side with batch sparging, while others will take the side of fly sparging. They both generally yield very similar efficiencies, so ...


1

Try buying a can of Barkeepers Friend. It's sold in most grocery stores, as well as Home Depot & Lowe's. It's a gritty, Comet style cleanser that doesn't scratch surfaces. Once I had soot build up from 3 different batches & Barkeepers friend took it off with one vigorous wash! I swear by it!



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