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8

This gunk is what's known as "trub", and it is proteins left over from the hot and cold breaks. The experiment conducted here: http://brulosophy.com/2014/06/02/the-great-trub-exbeeriment-results-are-in/ seems to show that it doesn't really matter whether it's included in the fermenter or not, but most people still remove it/don't add it.


7

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


6

As someone noted, chlorine and chloride are two different things. Basically, zero chlorine and chloramine is desirable in your beer. Chlorine can bind with phenols in beer and form chlorophenols, a common homebrew flaw that leads to off-flavors described as medicinal, plastick-y, band-aid-like, or sometimes like electrical smoke. There are many ways to ...


5

There is a distinct difference between chloride, which is a dissolved Cl- ion, and free residual chlorine (or the longer-lasting chloramine ions). The chloride is likely fine. The 61ppm concentration would make your water smell like a pool (or stronger) if it were chlorine. A chlorine residual test must be conducted within 15 minutes of taking the sample. ...


4

Seal the beer off from oxygen as soon as possible. If you decide to use the airlock, use sanitized water only. If you have access to CO2, put a layer of the gas over your beer as soon as possible (then close it off). If you've achieved your desired final gravity and you don't need to let it sit in the fermenter any longer, you could also bottle it or keg it ...


4

The whole "Brew in a Bag" methodology is based on using a very fine bag to filter the wort, just as you suggest. Its certainly feasible and something a lot of home brewers do (it doesn't scale up to pro-brewing sizes).


4

This is called "vorlauf" and yes, it is traditional. That being said, it's also a highly effective way of producing a clear sweet wort. I would guess that you'd need a fairly fine filter, not just a mesh strainer, to achieve the same level of clarity produced by recirculating a few quarts of wort. The filter would need to be so fine that you'd either need a ...


4

Whoof... I would not recommend doing a full boil inside an apartment if you can possibly avoid it. You're basically putting a gallon or two worth of water into the air. Things will get muggy quite quickly. Presuming you can't get a natural gas hookup, you'll be restricted to butane burners; propane gives off too much carbon monoxide. Even with a butane ...


4

Based on my own experience, an 8 gal. kettle will barely work for a 5 gal. batch. Even at that, you might have to boil a concentrated wort and add top up water after the boil. Remember that in addition to accounting for trub and evaporation, you also need some headroom in there to start with. I wouldn't recommend anything less than 15 gal. for a 10 gal. ...


4

Use the "Can I mash it?" calculator at http://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml According to that, 8 kg of grain will fit with enough water for 1.25 liters/kg mash thickness with .64 liters of headspace.


4

There's basically no need to do a "secondary" fermentation. Time in secondary is just as good as time in primary. You can go straight from primary to bottling if you like, so long as fermentation has actually finished. Once the krausen falls further, and you get the same gravity readings over the course of 2-3 days, you can bottle straight away. However, ...


3

As mentioned, BTUs are your primary issues. "Turkey Fryers" are very popular and kick out enough power. Side concerns would be storage. Gas bottles, burners and pots take up a LOT of space. Keep that in mind then purchasing the items. Gas bottles should not be stored indoors. Please follow COMMON SENSE and your local rules and regulations regarding the use ...


3

Its two different options. You can either do the malt version or the extract version. Wheat Liquid Malt Extract is actually a mix (usually 50/50) of wheat malt and pils/2-row/pale malt, depending on the manufacturer.


3

You could do either. If you leave it at 144, you should definitely let it sit longer. Even a difference of 5 degrees F. can make a significant impact on how long it takes starch to break down (it could take twice as long, or more). It will definitely still convert at 144, and will give you a more fermentable wort (and the resulting beer will be drier). ...


3

There is no particular reason I am aware of that normal fermentations for extract vs. all-grain brews should be different. Perhaps some examples that you've noticed might help? Fermentation time is mostly a function of yeast health, wort oxygenation levels, yeast pitch rate, the gravity of the beer, and temperature. While extract might generally have less ...


2

Sounds normal to me. When I was first reading up about BIAB, it was mentioned in several places that this is an issue. Absorbing 3/4 of 5 gallons seems like a bit much, but it will absorb some (I've heard about a quart per pound?). It probably didn't absorb that much, as the wort would drain out of the bag if you could hold it over the pot for 10-20 minutes. ...


2

I have this exact same problem and it started showing up when I went to all grain. Some of the BSG kits I've done use a steeping grain process where the grains are pre-milled and they all turned out great. My extract brews have also been great. In every case I've used the same water source (tap water)... From the first all-grain batch to my latest they have ...


2

The excess soot is from incomplete combustion of your propane (C₃H₈ + 5O₂ -> 3CO₂ + 4H₂O) is the complete combustion reaction. You need to increase the amount of oxygen, not propane. The flame should burn blue and non-luminescent. A yellow or orange flame indicates incomplete combustion and by products such as carbon monoxide (g) "CO" and solid carbon (s) ...


2

Well, it depends on the losses you assume along the way. For 5 gallons, if you assume a trub loss of 0.5 gallons, and evaporation loss of 1.0 gallon, then you would need 6.5 gallons of wort to get 5 gallons into a fermenter. If you follow the oft-quoted rule of thumb that you want minimum headspace in your kettle equal to one-third of your boil volume, that ...


2

RDWHAHB. Your beer is probably fine. Gases generally flow out during primary fermentation, not draw in. If you want to leave the beer in primary for a while, put some water in the airlock. If you want to rack to secondary, rack. Now actually might be a good time to take a hydrometer sample. Taste the sample to convince yourself that your beer is OK.


2

There are many mail-order or online places to get these components, but local hardware stores will typically not have everything you need. There might be a specialty plumbing store near you or a Grainger Industrial Supply type store near you. If that does not work, you can order online from sites like bargainfittings.com or fittingsandadapters.com.


2

I would say 1.5" is plenty high. I have a 7.5 gal kettle that came with a spigot positioned about 2.5" above the bottom and I almost always found that I had to tip the kettle to get all the wort out. Depending on your chilling method, if you can manage to allow the trub to settle out while chilling, or don't 'mind waiting 30 minutes or so after your done ...


2

Not really. Time will reduce the bitterness somewhat, but not a great deal. If it's undrinkable, your best bet is to brew a second beer with very little hop bitterness and blend the two beers.


2

A function of boiling rate is the amount of surface area. I have some really large surface-area pots (tuna-can shaped). A trick I do to increase the boil rate without increasing heat is float a stainless steel bowl or pot on top to decrease surface area. I maybe reduce surface area 25-35%. If it is a case where you are borderline this trick may bump you ...


2

You should never use a city profile to decide what water to use. You have no idea if the profile given is still accurate or if the brewers treat the water before they use it. It's much more accurate to use a color/flavor profile like the ones in Bru'nwater.


2

This sounds like it could be chlorophenols (typically perceived as plasticky / band-aids / medicinal / chemical flavors). If you're not using Chlorine-based sanitizers, this may have been caused by a wild yeast or bacterial infection. The fact that you also noted flocculation (cloudy) and carbonation issues is generally in line with the notion of an ...


2

I made a Strawberry Saison last Summer and the 1lb/per gallon was a nice subtle flavor, but I think I may raise the to 1.5 pounds next time. Also, I used frozen strawberries which I gently crushed. Let them thaw a bit at the bottom of the secondary and then racked on top of them. The beer was able to use all of the fruit this way.


2

There are many causes of haze in beer. Here you're assuming that the haze is from the yeast, but it may be chill haze, which takes a long time to settle out, if at all. Take a sample of the beer and warm it to room temperature. If the haze disappears then you know it was chill haze.


1

You can be sure that Munich's brewers don't just turn on the tap and start making beer also you should assume it varies over time so what the water profile is on a given day, when it was measured, is less use to you than you might think. At the very least the water was probably boiled before use which will change the chemistry significantly. Things have ...


1

Typically, people either do extract/partial boil/late addition or smaller batches if they are using a stove top. For an all grain-full boil, you pretty much need to use a stand alone burner or some other system that produces a good rolling boil. Commercial brewers use techniques like a calandria to reduce DMS while boiling off only 4%, but a stand alone ...



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