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6

Yes, you can make a concentrated wort and the dilute that after the boil as with extract. The key differences are: lower mash efficiency: higher gravity mashes tend to have lower conversion efficiency. To keep boil volume to a minimum, you might even choose not to sparge, and just use the first runnings - expect conversion efficiency around 50%. More ...


5

First, keep in mind that Mr. wizard is a commercial brewer and his answers come from that point of view. It may not be applicable to homebrewers. Using wheat may be about the only case where using a protein rest may be of benefit. But it'a not a given. There are still proteolytic enzymes left in the malt. Due to the high protein content of wheat, it can ...


5

The core question is … Why? Different ions lead to different perceived properties in the finished beer; for one example: higher concentrations of chloride emphasize malt character, whereas higher concentrations of sulfate emphasize hop character and dryness. When? Both in the mash and in the sparge water, mostly based on the ratio in volume, with some ...


4

The HLT (Hot Liquor Tank) interestingly isn't there to hold wort or anything with alcohol (liquor here is referring to a liquid being used in a process). It has a simple job: It holds and heats water to be used in the mash. You also add salts such as gypsum in the HLT. With 10 gallon batches, a 5 gallon HLT absolutely not big enough. That being said, the ...


4

With 2 pumps, you don't need to worry about gravity feed to the fermenter. Also, for 10 gal. of finished beer I'd recommend something bigger than a 10 gal. pot. That's about all the help I can give you since I've brewed 452 batches using a cooler and wouldn't think of doing it any other way.


4

Clarity of wort has no bearing on the clarity of the finished beer. Beer clarity is much more dependent on things like proper pH and mash conversion an d a large amount of flour should have no effect. My crush is very fine with a large amount of flour and my efficiency ranges from 80-85%. Based on that, it's difficult to believe your wort loss is solely ...


3

Flaked wheat is raw wheat - it's not been malted. This means that the enzymes that would normally help convert the starches to sugars have not even been created yet, since this is one affect of malting. "Normal" wheat is also called "red" wheat, due to the slight reddish hue it has. The grain is malted, and so has the ability to convert it's own starches ...


3

I am planning on buying a Country Living Mill, and I am both baking and brewing. I was researching if the mill could be used for crushing malt as well. A lot of people have been asking this question, but I've only found one person actually having tried it. According to him it crushes the malt nicely and leaves the husks. Here is the link: ...


3

A good crush should keep the grain husks intact, since they will then filter out the flour and provide an efficient lauter. I also crush reasonably finely, which does produce some flour, but as long as the husks are intact you're good. I have a 3 roller mill - the sales pitch was that it doesn't pulverize the husks as much as a 2 roller. I've not used a 2 ...


3

Whether or not they're really necessary depends on the water you have and the beer you want to brew. You need to start by getting an analysis of your water. Some water districts provide all the info you need, but many of them don't. If not, an excellent resource is wardlab.com. Get test W-6. As the what the info means and how you need to adjust your ...


3

It affects mainly the quantity of grains you need to produce a particular beer. Beers come out great with low efficiency, you just need to use more grain to produce them. On a homebrew scale, efficiency doesn't really make significant cost issue. Some people maintain that lower efficiency (e.g. no sparge) can taste more malty than beers where higher ...


2

I would say that it's not sufficient for 10 gallon batch unless you're happy refilling, 3-4 times. I brew 10 gallons and have a 20 gallon HLT which I fill to 18-19 gallons at the start of brewday, and use all of it. For a 10 gallon batch, many target 11-12 gallons into the fementor. This means a preboil volume in the order of 14-16 gallons depending upon ...


2

You could go a number of different routes. Homebrewing can be as complicated or as easy as you want it to be. You need 3 pieces of equipment: HLT, Mash Tun, Boil Kettle. For that price, I would get a large kettle (at least 11 gallons) with a ball valve. For mash tun, get a cooler and buy a conversion. HLT can be another 10 Gallon kettle with ball valve. ...


2

The beer will probably be drier, since I imagine your final mash temperature was in the range of 140-145°F - lower mash temps produce drier beer since there is a greater portion of fermentables. You may also lose body, since the temperature is not optimal for alpha amylase, which produces body enhancing dextrins, and is also close to the protein rest, so ...


2

Most maltsters ship their grains in bags that are not air-tight, but they don't recommend storing them for long periods of time (12 months, max). A plastic jug isn't as air-tight as it seems because it is gas permeable. Even if it was air-tight, it wouldn't matter unless you used nitrogen or CO2 to flush-out all oxygen from the container. Nobody really ...


1

White wheat and flaked wheat are both adjuncts and should be used in conjunction with a base malt (like wheat malt). From John Palmer's book on the former two adjuncts: Unmalted wheat is a common ingredient in wheat beers, including: American Wheat, Bavarian Weisse, and is essential to Belgian Lambic and Wit. It adds starch haze and high levels of ...



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