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10

Some things I can think of to increase body: Milk stouts use lactose, or milk sugar, to increase perceived body and sweetness. Lactose is unfermentable by yeast and so passes to the finished beer. Dextrin malt (CaraPils, CaraFoam) will impart a nice bit of body without adding crystal-malt-flavor (something I don't like in stouts). Mash high. Try 156°+ for ...


6

Brewing textbooks I referred to universally state that the gap between the rollers of the mill needs to be much closer together for wet-milling. You don't mention making any adjustments, so I'll assume you didn't. Since the husk is made more elastic by conditioning, the dangers of pulverizing it with too tight a mill are eliminated, and in fact it may do a ...


6

Well you don't steep any grain "during the boil". But to avoid upsetting mash pH you can steep all your non mash required grains in the wort during runoff in the kettle before you start the boil. I routinely add my roasted and crystal malts to a grain bag and steep them this way when I make stouts. Another application of steeping malts is to actually make ...


5

The prevailing wisdom on these so called "east coast" IPAs is three fold: The use of ~10% of flaked oats in the grist. A combo of super huge late kettle additions as well as dry hopping. Lastly, the use of London Ale III from Wyeast (Wyeast 1318). Despite London Ale III being a great flocculating English Ale yeast, in the presence of huge amounts of hop ...


3

It's basically as straightforward as you think. Weissbier/weizen recipes vary, but you're looking at 40-60% wheat malt, with the balance being mostly pilsner or pale/2-row malt, maybe a touch of carapils for residual sugars/body. The biggest thing to note is that crushed grain as a much more limited lifetime than whole grain that you crush on demand. But ...


3

A lot of times, you can add something to the secondary fermentation for a finishing taste. For instance, if you added cocoa nibs to secondary, you'd end up with chocolate on the finish. If you added a fruity hop (like Galaxy) to secondary, you'd pick up on melon or passion fruit on the finish. I've seen folks cold brew coffee and add that for a coffee ...


3

No diastatic power Means that this malt does not have the required enzymes to break down starches into sugars. In other words, you need to add some malt that has diastatic power in conjunction to make it work. The diastatic power is measured in Lintner degrees. It is estimated that you need a minimum 30°L in your mash to have sufficient diastatic ...


3

It's impossible to say without knowing the recipe, and your existing water etc.. It could go either way, but I'd be inclined to say you'll be fine. It does sound more than we'd typically add to a 5 gallon batch, but I don't see what negative affects it will have, and it clearly did raise the pH over time which was the intent. To put some numbers to it, 5 ...


3

There are two stages you are "loosing" water, and each have different mechanism: Mash and sparge Boil Let's talk them one at a time. Mash & Sparge loses There are two reasons for that. First is stuck filtering. If your malt is dripping wet, but nothing comes from the filter, this is the case. See Preventing a Stuck Sparge for details how to deal ...


3

Losses of water in the brewing process are common. There are some that are unavoidable and some that are controllable to a point. 1. Absorption by Grain: Your dry grain will absorb water at a rate of 0.96*(weight of grain). The 0.96 is a ratio, so if you use kg of grain, for every 1 kg of grain, you will lose 0.96 kg of water (~960 mL). If you use pounds, 1 ...


2

The volume to use is the final volume you are aiming for in the fermenter; yes the post boil volume. Lovibond -> SRM °L = (SRM + 0.76) ÷ 1.3546


2

I have two very rough guesses. First, are there any points where you are boiling uncovered where you could change and cover the pot? Second, your boiler is 52l? Given how large that is I expect you're producing a lot of steam in the boiler due to its increased surface area. Try skipping the boiler, sparge back into your HLT instead of the boiler. Having ...


2

1.5 gallon batch? You should fine. The higher grain to water ratio may result in a slightly high pH but you should still be well in the range for enzymes to do their work.


2

If your brewhouse consitantly achieves 95% just use that setting in your recipe/brew software and it will cascade to the grains allowing you to reduce their wieghts to hit a target OG. This will mainly result in a reduction in the base malt, while keeping most specialty grains close to original weights. Or you can estimate by hand, if a recipe is calculated ...


2

Not really. A longer sparge increases the likelihood of astringent grain flavors. Yes the longer the sparge the more you get out of the mash, but there is a trade off between more and more of the converted sugar (efficiency) and the extraction of more than sugar in the form of astringent compounds. It is true, that if you collected more water then yes you'...


2

I don't think you can do it with just that grain bill. For that look and mouth feel you need to use oats or a lot of wheat. Use a high mash temp for bigger protiens. Short boil to keep the proteins, avoid the hot break, basically a slow simmer just for hops and sanitation Slow chill to allow more chill haze, avoid the cold break. Doing this will make a ...


2

I think you're good, if you're cold steep gave you the color and flavor you wanted. Just a note. Tannins give the bitter astringency and are only extracted from husks when ph is above 6.0 AND temp is 170° or above. So on that part they could have been full husk and mashed, but you would have more roast flavor extraction over the cold steeping. Also this ...


2

Clone recipe posted here don't know how legal it was for them to post, and how legal for me would be to re-post here. Manufacturer's site gives you ingredients: pilsner malt, German lager yeast, German Perle hops It also gives you parameters to target, for use with software like BrewTarget: ABV 8.0% IBU 25 Color 8 SRM BYO recipe follows these pretty ...


2

It could be many things at this point. It may just be happy yeast in suspension. But sounds more like the hot break and cold break proteins are still in the wort. They should drop out after fermentation. When a lot of these proteins are available to yeast it can produce some off flavors (some even desirable) generally not a huge concern for most styles Most ...


1

Basically any roasted malt have little to no enzymes from the heat in processing the malt and have already had thier sugars converted internally from enzymes. Mashing them does nothing special for them. So steeping crystal, carmel, roasted, carapils and carafoam can give the same results as adding them to the mash. Possibly even better results given the ...


1

I've done the Morebeer Irish Red Ale kit. Was very simular to a couple commercial examples noted in bjcp 2015 . Here's the recipe for 5gal. 10lb 2-Row 1lb Crystal 120L 8oz Abbey 8oz Caramunich 2oz Black Roasted 2oz Special B 1.5oz northern brewer 60min 2oz Willamette 1min WLP004 Irish Ale Yeast


1

A lot of big beers get thier high OG from boiling off water since there is a limit to grain extraction. For example a Wee Heavy can require a 3-4 hour boil. Check your recipe and make sure it doesn't rely on a long boil for the OG. IMO you can't go wrong with a 90 minute boil just for DMS reduction.


1

Well for starters that is still a very dark malt 225L. It's marketed to give more 'black' flavor with less color. But could easily go really dark if overdosed. Castle recommends up to 5% of grist for porters and stouts. If your color target is 'red' you need to keep in the 18-28 SRM area. This would be a very small addition of this malt 1% or so. Edit: ...


1

For a second batch you can try ester enhancement, but I don't know of a yeast that will give this ester in the amount you want without it being clouded with other esters and phenols. He'Brew Rejewvenator actually brews with concord and merlot grapes. There are many answers here how to do fruit additions What I would try actually is a post fermenation ...


1

I'm doing an AG porter recipe. Historically, I have been dissatisfied with my porters - they come out thin... The answer to thin, as in mouth-feel, is normally in your malt bill, the yeast you choose and your mash thickness and temps. See here. Mash ph also plays a role, but it isn't the only contributing factor, and the ph is affected by the other factors....


1

In addition to what mdma stated. High ppm of calcium could give the finished beer a "mineral water" flavor, but this is appropriate in many styles. You may want to consider RO or distilled bottled water at least 50/50 with your filtered water. This will help with the pH and cut down on the Chloramine.


1

Here are a few recipes that you can look at for help: http://beersmithrecipes.com/searchrecipe?uid=&term=Weizen&submit.x=13&submit.y=9&sort=Best+Match&allgrain=1&rated=4


1

Not this one no diastatic power This means that there are no active enzymes. Or at least none that could create maltose, so even if you would create some wort-like liquid, it would not be good beer wort. It have enough starch, it just lack the power to make it usable for your yeast. But if you really want to Then you may simply buy alpha and beta ...


1

I don't think there was much you could do on the fermentation side to fix anything. I'd still have planned ferment it out, plan to dry hop it heavily to try and create a little more balance. Then I'd learn form the experience and get ready to re-brew the beer I wanted to brew. To limit your efficiency, you could sparge a little faster or ease up on the ...


1

Franklin P Combs and Atron Seige are completely correct with their suggestions. Google Brewers Best Milk Stout recipe. It's my favorite extract recipe and is nice and thick. It also uses lactose and maltodextrin. The ingredients for Brewer's Best Milk Stout are: Fermentables 3.3 lb. Special Dark LME 3.3 lb. Light LME .5 lb. Lactose .5 lb. ...



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