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8

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ale yeast. Lactose would add sweetness and take away from the crisp finish most people would find desirable in this kind of beer. That's why the recipe calls ...


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


5

I'm not sure what you mean by a bucket, but what I have in my head is a 5G plastic bucket with a tap in it. If that's the case, no it will not work. You need to have some sort of container that can hold up under carbonation. The same thing with your ghetto way of bottle, they won't stand up to the carbonation. Personally, I like the 32oz EZTop bottles. ...


5

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


4

If you add near boiling water to fermenting wort, then yes, you can definitely kill some of the yeast, at least, any yeast that come in contact with that near boiling water. If there was enough yeast in the fermenter, distributed in other parts of the beer, then a lot of it may still be alive. If you see signs of fermentation (bubbling airlock, krausen) it ...


4

First of all, it's highly unlikely that the beer will be ready to drink in 8 days, no matter what the instructions say. In general, it's more like a month. But you can try it and see what you think. That gives you plenty of time to order bottles. You could easily leave your beer in the fermenter for a month or more and you'd likely be better off for it. ...


4

No, the brew is not ruined. It's actually quite a small amount of sugar, and that will have been fermented out now, assuming it was sitting at room temperature (at least 15°C/59°F) Simply add the same quantity of sugar again and bottle. One thing that may have happened with the delay is the beer may have picked up a yeast bite if it's still sitting ...


3

In general, adding lactose will add sweetness and overall silkier/creamier mouthfeel. Perhaps you are confusing the name with milk stouts, or "cream" stouts which do use lactose to achieve this creamy mouthfeel. Milk stouts fall into a different category of BJCP, #13B, rather than #6 for cream ales. This article gives you a good idea of the flavour and usage ...


3

Also check out Clarity Ferm. Its not FDA approved to reduce to FDA's definition of "Gluten Free", but it will typically drop out enough glutens (almost all of them) to avoid reaction unless it is a really serious/intense allergy if I understand correctly. This way you can avoid brewing with sorgum, quinoa, and other equivalent PITAs, and just make any ...


3

There are many resources out there for GF home brewing. I made a quick search and I found some good recipes and information, unfortunately I can't post more than two links.. http://www.glutenfreehomebrewing.org


3

You can use plastic soda bottles, with the benefit that they larger than regular glass bottles so you don't need to fill as many. (And you don't need a capper.) You can just leave the beer alone for a few days until you get the bottles. The secondary fermentation and subsequent conditioning happens in the bottle anyway after you add the priming sugar.


3

I don't think the near boiling water on its own will cause any harm. But unless you boiled it for a few minutes to remove oxygen before you added it, oxidation could be a problem.


2

The yeast will be fine; I don't think you could have raised the temperature by more than 4 or 5 degrees F. That's not enough to harm the yeast, but it may result in increased ester production, giving the finished beer a fruity aroma. The beer will also be diluted a small amount, which is not a good thing. When raising the temperature of the fermenting ...


2

I recently did a saison using only Brettanomyces Claussenii, and it turned out very interesting. Despite many misconceptions, brett will not sour beer. I didn't even see much in the way of a pellicle as many claim to get when they ferment with Brett. White labs doesn't condense down the yeast when they package it, so it isn't much to look at in comparison ...


1

Speaking to the original question, strictly speaking, No, you don't have to bottle or keg. Your could cask your beer as a traditional Ale would have been.


1

Sasion yeast can handle the high temperatures. But it's a style unto itself. I wouldn't recommend trying to brew an IPA or a Stout with Sasion yeast. I know many home brewers have success using a swamp cooler to control temperature.


1

There's a list of yeasts with temperature ranges here - http://beerandwinejournal.com/high-temp-yeast/ It's mainly Belgian abbey/trappist/saison yeast straings, with Saison being the high-temp winner.


1

Im from Venezuela (80 ºF) so I´m familiar to those off flavor you mention. In my (really short humble) experience, when brewing regular beers, using S-03 and fermenting in a cool room (no a refrigerated one, just a dark corner) does the trick. Although when trying higher-gravity beers (OG 1.060) with S-03 sometimes we get some "Hot alcohol" flavors, like ...



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