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4

Don't use commercially produced Graham crackers, as these will contain unconvertible starches, oils, fats, preservatives, etc that can wreck your beer. Also, you can never assume that a finished flavor will transfer into a fermented product like that. I was on a quest once to get "graham cracker" flavor into a brown ale, and while I never got the perfect ...


4

Don't worry so much. Put some sanitized foil over the top and wrap with a rubber band. If the beer is chilled to pitching temp before being transferred to the fermenter, air locks are absolutely unnecessary to keep beer from being contaminated.


3

This could be bad for the beer that's in there now. If fermentation vessel doesn't have a good seal the beer could be contaminated. It's not guaranteed to spoil though, it might turn out ok. It is also possible that if you mess with the seal now, you could accidentally introduce contamination that wouldn't have taken hold otherwise. Without knowing more of ...


2

I have never tried it, but if I wanted to I would rather add grains that have that flavour (pilsner malt) as opposed to adding the actual cracker. [Added on request] Here is a document (25Mb) from Weyermann Maltings that shows the flavour charts of their malt as well as the resulting wort.


2

I once made ginger candy. The secret to the spiciness was in heating the ginger, letting it cool and then heating it again. Each heating and cooling cycle added quite a bit more kick to the ginger. I would imagine the same would be true for ginger beer. After the fourth cycle, the ginger was so spicey that I could not eat it!


1

Dry Irish Stout (Guinness) is a dark to black ale with chocolate/cacao flavours and aromas. A Cream Ale is similar to a Budweiser, but brewed with ale yeast instead of lager yeast. Flavour and aroma on a cream ale is low to none. Some brewers (like Kilkenny) call their beer a cream ale because it has a creamy mouthfeel (from the nitro).


1

The calculators are someone's idea of what the style should be. Each brewery will do something different depending on tradition, marketing, and what they think their customers like. You are your only customer. What do you like? High carbonation, or low carbonation? I like low carbonation. I never do more than 2 volumes of CO2. For a 19L batch at room ...


1

I routinely use 150g of sucrose for 18-19 liter batches, and rarely have over carbonation. And then, only if I keep the beer in a warm place for a long time. No exploded bottles yet. That being said, you should give the yeast plenty of time to flocculate before bottling, and don't open them when warm.


1

You might also consider brewing beverages that are ok to brew in warm temperatures, i.e mead. I've had great results with mead at 75°F, using Lalvin wine yeast for white wines, especially Prise de Mousse, the champagne yeast. Plus, you probably have unique honey available to you there.


1

It could be OK, the majority of flavour compounds form in the first three days of primary. You will almost certainly get faster carbonation, and you may get a slightly more ester rich aroma but I think you should be fine. I bottle in summer in the UK around 25C/77F and I get good carbonation and no ill effects. I conduct primary at 17C to 20C in the cellar,...


1

The longer you heat it, the stronger it is. Don't use the liquid into it's cooled with the ginger in it. Acid and chili pepper or Cayanne help as well, I use cayenne and lime.good luck



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