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8

I don't think lactose is desirable in a cream ale. Don't let the name fool you, cream ales have no cream or lactose or anything of the sort. They're basically American lager type beers fermented with ale yeast. Lactose would add sweetness and take away from the crisp finish most people would find desirable in this kind of beer. That's why the recipe calls ...


6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


5

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not carbonate but the ones sitting on top of those, off the floor, did carbonate. Eventually, I started putting them in the laundry room on a shelf above the dryer, where ...


5

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


5

I'm not sure what you mean by a bucket, but what I have in my head is a 5G plastic bucket with a tap in it. If that's the case, no it will not work. You need to have some sort of container that can hold up under carbonation. The same thing with your ghetto way of bottle, they won't stand up to the carbonation. Personally, I like the 32oz EZTop bottles. ...


4

First of all, it's highly unlikely that the beer will be ready to drink in 8 days, no matter what the instructions say. In general, it's more like a month. But you can try it and see what you think. That gives you plenty of time to order bottles. You could easily leave your beer in the fermenter for a month or more and you'd likely be better off for it. ...


3

Also check out Clarity Ferm. Its not FDA approved to reduce to FDA's definition of "Gluten Free", but it will typically drop out enough glutens (almost all of them) to avoid reaction unless it is a really serious/intense allergy if I understand correctly. This way you can avoid brewing with sorgum, quinoa, and other equivalent PITAs, and just make any ...


3

There are many resources out there for GF home brewing. I made a quick search and I found some good recipes and information, unfortunately I can't post more than two links.. http://www.glutenfreehomebrewing.org


3

You can use plastic soda bottles, with the benefit that they larger than regular glass bottles so you don't need to fill as many. (And you don't need a capper.) You can just leave the beer alone for a few days until you get the bottles. The secondary fermentation and subsequent conditioning happens in the bottle anyway after you add the priming sugar.


3

Carbonation I agree with @Sander's recommendation to use an online priming sugar calculator. I respectfully disagree that carbonating in bottles is an art -- it is repeatable science. One way to get close enough to moderately carbonated beer, but not necessarily precisely what the styles calls for, is to use carbonation drops, Coopers tabs, Prime Tabs, ...


3

In general, adding lactose will add sweetness and overall silkier/creamier mouthfeel. Perhaps you are confusing the name with milk stouts, or "cream" stouts which do use lactose to achieve this creamy mouthfeel. Milk stouts fall into a different category of BJCP, #13B, rather than #6 for cream ales. This article gives you a good idea of the flavour and usage ...


3

If you saw a beer head during the 2nd fermentation, you likely just let the beer get too cold. Ales tend to like 70F+ bottle fermenting conditions. You can tell if your beer's yeast has died by the foam created when mixing in sugar. The reaction will always create alcohol and CO2. The reaction creates bubbles, which make the foam during fermentation. ...


2

I think the most likely cause is not overpriming, but that you bottled it too soon. Even at as high a temperature as you used, it's pretty unlikely that the beer was finished fermenting in 6 days. Even if it was, that's not enough time for yeast and proteins to drop out and the beer to clear. I highly recommend keeping it refrigerated for 3 ...


2

Ehhhh, not having 50 points... Either way, I would HIGHLY recommend not opening up the bottles and adding anything, or taking anything else out. This is just asking for contamination or at least oxygenation. Warm the bottles up a bit should work. Or letting them sit longer works too. Also, the yeast that is left in suspension when bottling is normally the ...


1

There is always plenty of yeast in suspension unless one did an extended cold store in secondary. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast. I wouldn't add more priming sugar yet. I'd make sure the keg is warm enough and give it more time. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast, but it can be finicky to dropping temps and alcohol. 5 days is a little ...


1

You can always leave them longer at the lower temperature, or bring them up to 70ish. Which Yeast did you use specifically? Did you re-pitch yeast during bottling or it was warm for the initial pitch? 80-85 is pretty warm for Ale Yeasts. Wouldn't kill it, but might give off some flavors that aren't wanted. Prior to bottling were you still getting bubbles ...


1

It might be that your beer is quite strong (you didn't mention the OG), and the yeast has bowed out. (what yeast did you use?) What's the current reading on the brew? I'd open up a couple of bottles, add a few crumbs of dehydrated yeast with a high alcohol tolerance (at this stage, using champagne yeast is quite ok, try it on a few bottles). Close it up ...


1

Speaking to the original question, strictly speaking, No, you don't have to bottle or keg. Your could cask your beer as a traditional Ale would have been.



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