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6

If you produce the same volume of beer with more malt, this will increase both alcohol and residual sweetness. It's the residual sweetness that will give it a heavier body. A couple other things you could try that won't affect the alcohol content as much: Mash at a higher temperature. Keeping the mash temperature close to 156 F. will lead the creation of ...


5

I agree with Tobias on more unfermentable sugars (high mash temp) and dextrine malts (carapils). I'm adding a separate answer because I've had good luck adding maltodextrin. Carapils, which is supposed to do the same thing, has given me somewhat inconsistent results - that is sometimes I notice it and sometimes I don't. People tend to use maltodextrin more ...


4

If you add near boiling water to fermenting wort, then yes, you can definitely kill some of the yeast, at least, any yeast that come in contact with that near boiling water. If there was enough yeast in the fermenter, distributed in other parts of the beer, then a lot of it may still be alive. If you see signs of fermentation (bubbling airlock, krausen) it ...


4

No, the brew is not ruined. It's actually quite a small amount of sugar, and that will have been fermented out now, assuming it was sitting at room temperature (at least 15°C/59°F) Simply add the same quantity of sugar again and bottle. One thing that may have happened with the delay is the beer may have picked up a yeast bite if it's still sitting ...


4

Basically what you've described is cold conditioning an ale, a fairly normal practice. It allows the beer to clarify and smooth, the same way it does with a lager. There is no need to let the beer warm before bottling. There's still plenty of yeast in it, and the yeast will become active once you add priming sugar and let the beer sit at room temp to ...


3

Also check out Clarity Ferm. Its not FDA approved to reduce to FDA's definition of "Gluten Free", but it will typically drop out enough glutens (almost all of them) to avoid reaction unless it is a really serious/intense allergy if I understand correctly. This way you can avoid brewing with sorgum, quinoa, and other equivalent PITAs, and just make any ...


3

It's certainly possible that the banana esters are due to warm fermentation temperature. After sanitation, I'd argue that the most important step in brewing is fermentation temperature. You want both the correct temperature for your yeast (each yeast varies so check the manufacturer), and a consistent temperature. The method you mentioned helps primarily ...


2

Would placing the fermenter tank in a tub of water be a good way to handle hot environments? I started brewing extracts a couple of months ago and I started to do the "swamp cooler" method which sounds similar to that which you have postulated. The only difference is that I never replace the water. I would recommend using a outer bucket filled with water ...


2

The yeast will be fine; I don't think you could have raised the temperature by more than 4 or 5 degrees F. That's not enough to harm the yeast, but it may result in increased ester production, giving the finished beer a fruity aroma. The beer will also be diluted a small amount, which is not a good thing. When raising the temperature of the fermenting ...


2

I recently did a saison using only Brettanomyces Claussenii, and it turned out very interesting. Despite many misconceptions, brett will not sour beer. I didn't even see much in the way of a pellicle as many claim to get when they ferment with Brett. White labs doesn't condense down the yeast when they package it, so it isn't much to look at in comparison ...


1

Sasion yeast can handle the high temperatures. But it's a style unto itself. I wouldn't recommend trying to brew an IPA or a Stout with Sasion yeast. I know many home brewers have success using a swamp cooler to control temperature.


1

Im from Venezuela (80 ºF) so I´m familiar to those off flavor you mention. In my (really short humble) experience, when brewing regular beers, using S-03 and fermenting in a cool room (no a refrigerated one, just a dark corner) does the trick. Although when trying higher-gravity beers (OG 1.060) with S-03 sometimes we get some "Hot alcohol" flavors, like ...


1

I agree with others; I think your fluctuating temperature is the likely cause. I have never tried the swamp method but I am about to convert a refrigerator into a fermentation chamber. I have a temperature control unit I picked up on ebay from someone in Hong Kong - the unit name escapes me at the moment. I am going to by-pass the thermostat on the fridge ...



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