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5

It's probably just too cool. I had lots of problems with carbonation when I left my bottles in my 65-70 degree basement. In fact, I had one batch where the bottles on the concrete floor did not carbonate but the ones sitting on top of those, off the floor, did carbonate. Eventually, I started putting them in the laundry room on a shelf above the dryer, where ...


3

If you saw a beer head during the 2nd fermentation, you likely just let the beer get too cold. Ales tend to like 70F+ bottle fermenting conditions. You can tell if your beer's yeast has died by the foam created when mixing in sugar. The reaction will always create alcohol and CO2. The reaction creates bubbles, which make the foam during fermentation. ...


3

Carbonation I agree with @Sander's recommendation to use an online priming sugar calculator. I respectfully disagree that carbonating in bottles is an art -- it is repeatable science. One way to get close enough to moderately carbonated beer, but not necessarily precisely what the styles calls for, is to use carbonation drops, Coopers tabs, Prime Tabs, ...


2

Ehhhh, not having 50 points... Either way, I would HIGHLY recommend not opening up the bottles and adding anything, or taking anything else out. This is just asking for contamination or at least oxygenation. Warm the bottles up a bit should work. Or letting them sit longer works too. Also, the yeast that is left in suspension when bottling is normally the ...


2

I think the most likely cause is not overpriming, but that you bottled it too soon. Even at as high a temperature as you used, it's pretty unlikely that the beer was finished fermenting in 6 days. Even if it was, that's not enough time for yeast and proteins to drop out and the beer to clear. I highly recommend keeping it refrigerated for 3 ...


1

There is always plenty of yeast in suspension unless one did an extended cold store in secondary. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast. I wouldn't add more priming sugar yet. I'd make sure the keg is warm enough and give it more time. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast, but it can be finicky to dropping temps and alcohol. 5 days is a little ...


1

You can always leave them longer at the lower temperature, or bring them up to 70ish. Which Yeast did you use specifically? Did you re-pitch yeast during bottling or it was warm for the initial pitch? 80-85 is pretty warm for Ale Yeasts. Wouldn't kill it, but might give off some flavors that aren't wanted. Prior to bottling were you still getting bubbles ...


1

It might be that your beer is quite strong (you didn't mention the OG), and the yeast has bowed out. (what yeast did you use?) What's the current reading on the brew? I'd open up a couple of bottles, add a few crumbs of dehydrated yeast with a high alcohol tolerance (at this stage, using champagne yeast is quite ok, try it on a few bottles). Close it up ...



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