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Alcohol Losses from Entrainment in Carbon Dioxide Evolved during Fermentation H. W. Zimmermann, E. A. Rossi Jr. and E. Wick + Author Affiliations Research and Development, United Vintners, Asti, California Abstract Total losses of alcohol entrained in CO2 in laboratory experiments were shown to increase with: temperature of fermentation, alcohol level of ...


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The wort would have to reach a temperature of 174-178f(as this is the temperature range at which ethanol vaporizes) to lose any amount of alcohol worth worring about and thats not going to happen.


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Anything works since it creates a barrier to microbes. But if you are a beginner, some incident can occur and the fluid can be dripped inside the fermenter (over your beer), so prefer something that cannot spoil your beer, like water (dechlorinated), alcohol (ethanol), diluted StarSan, and so on.


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Not that it matters much, but the answer is VODKA, with the caveat that neither are as superior to water as you might imagine. StarSan concentrate works by lowering the pH of the water its added to. However, when you add StarSan to any water that isn't completely distilled, and is exposed to oxygen, then the StarSan starts breaking down, and the pH of the ...


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The actual sanitation qualities, when used as air-lock liquid, between the sanitizing solution you have on brewday (StarSan + water) and vodka are pretty much the same. My opinion - if you've had a lifelong fantasy of doing something and it's not very expensive, I'd say the benefits outweigh the costs!


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Personally, I use either distilled water or vodka. However, star-san is perfectly acceptable to put in an airlock, it isn't going to hurt the fermenting beer sitting below it. In fact, as I understand it, yeast actually LIKE smallish quantities of star-san and that is one of the several reasons to "not fear the foam"™ Now, there is one potential ...


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Does alcohol vapor escape via the airlock? Yes, it does; however, the amount that escapes is negligible in terms of affecting the alcohol level in the fermenter. If you go up to the fermenter and smell the top of the airlock as the primary begins to settle down, there is a very distinct scent of alcohol among the other aromas of breadiness, malt and hops. ...


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Not at all. Technically, you may be losing an absolutely, immeasurably tiny amount of alcohol, but it would have to vaporize from the beer, absorb or condense into whatever liquid is in your airlock and then vaporize out the other side. But practically speaking (which is what's really important) you'll never have to worry about this in an air-locked ...



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