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11

Not at all. Technically, you may be losing an absolutely, immeasurably tiny amount of alcohol, but it would have to vaporize from the beer, absorb or condense into whatever liquid is in your airlock and then vaporize out the other side. But practically speaking (which is what's really important) you'll never have to worry about this in an air-locked ...


8

Alcohol is the product of anaerobic respiration, the consumption of sugars by yeast. If you had access to a chemistry lab, you could measure the alcohol directly, but most calculate their alcohol by calculating the quantity of sugar that has been consumed. For the most part, this is done by comparing the OG to the FG. In other words, the OG by itself will ...


7

I don't think there's a direct relationship between ABV and perceived sweetness. Residual sugars contribute to the sweetness. One reason for this can be the use of low attenuative yeast strains either on purpose or otherwise. High gravity beers require yeasts that are tolerant of the high alcohol levels. Use of these alcohol tolerant strains can produce dry ...


6

The different strains of yeast really do affect attenuation considerably. I've had split batches of 1.055 beer coming out with FGs of 1.007 and 1.014 just from different strains of yeast. (The lower one was US-05.) I've not made a beer this big, but if I did, this is what I'd be thinking. As OG increases, FG increases faster since the yeast have a harder ...


6

I don't think you need a "different type" of yeast for this. In addition, I've found t hat using yeasts other than beer yeast can give you strange flavors that you don't really want. The key here is going to be to pitch a large quantity of healthy yeast. I'd make a 5 gal. batch of a 1.040-50 beer and use the entire slurry from it for your stout. Keep the ...


5

The problem could be from temperature, alcohol tolerance and pitching rates. While the solvent character will fade with time to some degree, it can take a many months to do so and will not completely disappear. Although I can't find published figures from Fermentis, S-04 has reportedly an alcohol tolerance of 10-11% in various forums. Your 1.111 beer gives ...


3

Alcohol Losses from Entrainment in Carbon Dioxide Evolved during Fermentation H. W. Zimmermann, E. A. Rossi Jr. and E. Wick + Author Affiliations Research and Development, United Vintners, Asti, California Abstract Total losses of alcohol entrained in CO2 in laboratory experiments were shown to increase with: temperature of fermentation, alcohol level of ...


3

Water - it's cheap, it's always available, and does the job adequately. No need for anything else when something so simple works so well.


2

To Exactly answer your questions: Is it possible, Does anyone know the process? Yes, you would have to ferment some wine then add a very high ABV% of Alcohol, acquired, paid or distilled by another means. Example ratio: 300ml of 10% wine + 700ml of 80% spirit = 59%ABV How much yeast, should I use in the grape juice? Go for 1 tsp per gallon(4.5L). can I ...


2

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


2

Beer made from barley malt will contain almost no methanol. Fruits high in pectin will produce some methanol, but it's only a health concern if you're distilling. (That being said, I've had some nasty hangovers after drinking plum wine.) I've never heard of a test strip to determine the methanol quantity of a liquid. If such a thing existed, the home ...


2

Well, theoretically you can add any kind of yeast to any kind of grape extract and, provided conditions are sanitary, you don't get an infection, and you give it enough time to ferment, you will have a wine of some sort. Unfortunately, it probably won't be very good. In fact, it will probably be horrible. To make drinkable wine will require proper juice, ...


1

The wort would have to reach a temperature of 174-178f(as this is the temperature range at which ethanol vaporizes) to lose any amount of alcohol worth worring about and thats not going to happen.


1

Does alcohol vapor escape via the airlock? Yes, it does; however, the amount that escapes is negligible in terms of affecting the alcohol level in the fermenter. If you go up to the fermenter and smell the top of the airlock as the primary begins to settle down, there is a very distinct scent of alcohol among the other aromas of breadiness, malt and hops. ...


1

Getting ABV at that level is possible through distillation process. Although it won't be classified as wine anymore if the ABV is 60%. Here you go to get started making wine. You can know how much yeast should be used at that tutorial as well. We can make wine using either brewer or baking yeast and it's drinkable, but you won't get optimal result if ...


1

Buy some wine yeast - don't use bread yeast - wine yeast is more alcohol tolerant and will give you the best chance of producing something like wine. But even so, nowhere near 60% - most yeasts stop around 14-18 percent abv.


1

Foil. :) Either vodka or star-san are perfectly fine. Water will work just as well. The liquid in an airlock does not strictly need to be sanitary, it just needs to provide a barrier for insects, primarily.



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