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9

Most of those ridiculously high ABV beers have been ice-distilled (some multiple times). Supposedly it's technically illegal for homebrewers since it's distilling, but it's basically just cooling the beer to the point where some of the water freezes and removing the ice. You can get pretty decent ABVs (12%+) without resorting to that though. You'll need a ...


8

Making a (good) hard root beer sounds tricky. At least, the traditional method of brewing root beer doesn't seem like it would scale well to the weeks-of-fermentation beer brewing model. I imagine in the end, while you would have higher alcohol content, too much of the sugar will have been fermented, so you'd end up with a few gallons of not very sweet ...


7

I went through exactly this about 9 months ago. I couldn't find anything online about it, so I used a basic cider as the inspiration. Here are the exact notes I took while brewing it. Some sections were direct copies from the cider recipe, I added the rest. 1lb Munton’s Dry Malt 2Fl Oz Root Beer Concentrate ¾ cup priming sugar 5lbs granulated sugar ...


6

Your process sounds fine - it's the way you're using the hydrometer that's the problem. To estimate alcohol content, you need to take a reading at the start of fermentation. You cannot read the alcohol content from the hydrometer alcohol scale at the end of fermentation. The hydrometer cannot measure the alcohol content directly, but it can estimate how ...


6

Depending upon quantities, there are many benefits to adding zinc. For example, you'll get better lacing, as zinc helps precipitate proteins. Zinc additions can also increase fermentation rate, improve the extent of attenuation, improve yeast vigour and viability, and improve beer flavour through stimulating acetate ester production and ...


6

14% would be pretty high, even for high gravity yeasts, but 11% is definitely realistic. There are a few tricks to getting high ABV. You want really good aeration so that the yeast are healthy, often this means aerating when pitching and again the day after. You also may want to add sugar slowly instead of putting it all in at once. This is easy with ...


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


5

If you're looking for a quick, easy calculation, you can use: ABV = (OG - FG)/.75 (and then multiply by 100 to get a percentage) or ABV = (OG - FG)*131 However, it's not a linear relationship, so there's a fair bit of error in both of those estimations but they'll get you within a half a percentage point of the actual value. If you are concerned about ...


4

You can add more yeast anytime if you like, but 1.040 to 1.014 sounds like its done fermenting to me. The beer isn't going to get much more fermented than what it is now. The beer would have to be pretty hot for the yeast to get completely killed off. There should be plenty of yeast left to carbonate the beer. If you really feel that yeast is the reason ...


4

There is brauhaus - a javascript library for homebrew beer calculations, both in the browser and on the server I have not used it - the homepage says features include: Support for multiple Javascript runtimes Node.js 0.6.x, 0.8.x, 0.10.x Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer 9+, Safari, Opera, etc Calculate estimated OG, FG, IBU, ABV, SRM color, ...


3

Ignoring the other ferementables (lime and pineapple juice) 3 cups of sugar weights about 600g - or 1.32lb. Table sugar has a potential of 1.046 points per pound per gallon, which gives an estimated SG of 46 x 1.32 / 2 = 30 gravity units So your ginger beer would have had an initial SG of 1.030. I plugged these figures into BeerSmith, which computes ...


3

You'll have trouble with the sugars fermenting. One option, which may or may not work, is to make the 'beer' to your target alcohol percentage, then filter it really good to pull out as much yeast as possible, and then perhaps add a potasium metabisulfite tablet or two to retard any remaining yeast. You could then add your sugar sweeteners without them ...


3

I asked a while back on adding peppers and was given a link to an excellent article on adding chillies to beer. I went with the dry hopping technique, and used chipotle peppers instead of the original plan of jalapenos or habaneros because I wanted the smokey flavor and I was not at all disappointed by the outcome. In fact, I loved it. I want to do it ...


3

You tagged with first-time-brewer... if this is true, I would caution against making an infused beer right out the gate. Fancy beers can be a tricky proposition. That said, my best guess is that you could do an infusion similar to using vanilla, since it seems like a similar plant. See this question & answers about vanilla. There's some discussion ...


2

Yes, you can pitch a low alcohol yeast and it will stop fermenting when it reaches it's alcohol tolerance, leaving your mead sweet due to the residual sugars. You do need to consider that the exact ABV at which the yeast stops working is variable and may not match exactly what is on the package. If necessary, you could add more sugar or honey after ...


2

Charlie Bamforth, in a recent episode of the beersmith podcast, mentioned that zinc was used in some UK Breweries to assist with head retention. He suggested that 2mg per litre would be about right (Its been a while since I listened so please check it out first, just in case you poision yourself!). If memory serves me, the discussion is towards the end of ...


2

A hop tea may work. However, the bitterness extracted from hops at pH > 6 becomes progressively harsher with higher pH. Thus, to get a more rounded bitterness, you should not boil in plain water, which has a pH > 7. You could try boiling the hops in a little of the fermented beer, since this will have pH in the ball park of what you need. (Fermented beer is ...


2

For very high gravity beers, you can use White Labs Super High Gravity Yeast - WLP099. It has a stated alcohol tolerance of 25%. You can use just this yeast, or use the regular yeast that you want to use to produce the dominant flavor profile, and then pitch WLP099 when fermentation is 2/3 complete (ideally, from an active fermenting starter comprising the ...


2

Both Denny Conn and mdma were correct to some extent. I am not able to pick who answered the question fully at this go of it. So I’ll answer with my own results and hope others experiment further to dial in the process. I planned on splitting a 5 gallon batch all along for comparison so I wouldn't feel it wasn't wasted if it didn't turn out. The design ...


1

Since you don't necessarily need the beer to be completely non-alcoholic, perhaps you could consider brewing an small (session) beer instead? Mashing at the higher end, perhaps with some flavourful caramel malts, wheat or rye for extra body and an small grain bill should give you a head start. I did some experiences with second (and third) runnings from ...


1

You cannot make a truly alcohol free beer. The best commercial brewers can do is get it down to about .5% ABV. At home, most report that about 1.5% ABV can be achieved with boiloff. However, it is reported to have a severely negative impact on flavor. Having tried this, I would advise you not to waste your time. The bitterness is concentrated, not ...


1

Alcohol (ethanol) freezes at -114°F (-84°C) so you could freeze-distill the beer which will freeze the water, but not the alcohol, so you can separate out the alcohol and measure that. Although I believe you have to do this slowly for the alcohol to separate out, so I don't think it's workable in practice. The freezing point of beer is related to ...


1

Heres a good bit of information from the mad fermentationist about alcohol content and fruit in beer: http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2010/10/adding-fruit-to-beer-increases-alcohol.html Fruit also contains other things (water) that will further dilute the beer, so the effect will be minimal, if anything at all, and can actually cause the total alcohol ...


1

The November/December issue of Zymurgy magazine has an article on adding chiles to beer. They recommend pairing a dark beer, like a brown ale, with dried red chiles. They cited examples of brewers either adding the chiles in the boil kettle, or using a dry hopping technique (adding chiles as an ingredient in the fermenter, usually during secondary ...


1

I use Brewtarget. It's a java open source utility that does all you need for brewing beer, including equipment calculations, mash/ sparge temps, estimates pre boil, post boil and finishing volumes and gravity, IBU, SRM and has some nice recipe and brewday instruction printouts.


1

There was a discussion on HBT about this. If you measure in Fahrenheit, the formula is as follows: C = ((1.313454 - (0.132674*F) + (0.00205779 * F^2) - (0.000002627634 * F^2))) Where C is the correction, and F is degrees Fahrenheit of the liquid being measured with the hydrometer. This assumes the hydrometer is calibrated for 59 degrees Fahrenheit. ...


1

Agreed with @brewchez. The SG of 1.014 tells you that a lot of fermenting has already happened (though it is odd that you saw no airlock activity; what about yeast foam on the surface or stuck to the sides of the fermenter just above the liquid level?). With an O.G. of 1.040 you'd usually expect a bit more attenuation, down to 1.010 or 1.012, unless you've ...


1

Short answer: Yes you can. You'll need to make a starter and get that yeast actively fermenting before you pour it into your main fermentor, though. That's now a fairly hostile environment, so adding them at the peak will help them deal with the low sugar & high alcohol environment that you'll be putting them in. I'd suggest a fairly neutral ...


1

I used Maple to plot the expression in your question as a two dimensional surface using the range of values you suggested. The plot looks rather flat in that region, so I chose the midpoint of your intervals (OG=1.065, FG=1.015) and computed the tangent plane to the surface at that point. (The tangent plane is the best linear approximation to the surface at ...


1

I spent some time this weekend dusting off my algebra. (Do not tell my high school algebra teacher that algebra was useful!) I tested this formula against the original for a range of typical brewing OG's (1.035 - 1.095) and FG's (1.002 - 1.028). I found that it didn't stray from the above calculation by more than 0.06% ABV. Considering the variables ...



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