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23

You are doing absolutely nothing wrong. Many people are far too quick to drink their precious homebrew and most beers benefit a lot from aging. A few months for ales and simple lagers. Beers with a high ABV should be aged much longer. I make a Chimay Grand Cru clone that I typically don't try for 4-6 months. Aging remove a lot of the "hot" taste from ...


11

There could be a few things going on: High Alcohols can improve in flavor after some time in cool, dark storage Sediment can drop out of beer after long, cool storage leading to better head formation and retention (since the sediment is no longer there to form a big nucleation site) Yeast in the beer, if still active, could be cleaning up some byproducts ...


8

This is a nice technical question involving some organic chemistry I do not comprehend. I'll begin with what I do know about bittering contributions from alpha acid and beta acids. These acids are components of the hop cone and contribute to bitterness in slightly different ways. The more familiar one is probably alpha acid since most hop bags are labeled ...


8

In general, higher-alcohol beers age better. Something like a barleywine in the 10+% ABV range would likely be a good choice. As for aging 21 years, that I couldn't speak to. I've aged Imperial Stouts up to 2 years, and they keep getting better. Dogfish Head claims their DFH 120 will age well up to 10 years, and I think that's better than 15% ABV. Edit ...


7

Somewhat. Lack of carbonation can really alter the flavor, but you should be able to pick out major characteristics or flaws in the beer. But I wouldn't advise reaching any real conclusions until the beer is carbed and has an appropriate conditioning time. That time will vary from beer to beer.


6

Not all beer matures at the same rate, and not all beer drinkers have the same tastes. For some examples, I like to drink really hoppy beers while they're fairly young and the hops are still vibrant. An altbier I'll cold condition for a couple months. Something like a tripel I prefer with maybe a month or 2 of age on it. The best thing to do is ...


6

I keg and most of my beers are tasting great at 4 weeks. Do some styles I brew take longer to "peak"? Yes. But for the most normal beers (pales, reds, wheats, blondes etc etc) they are tasting great around the forth week. I think my results has nothing to do with kegging though. If you are following the 1-2-3 rule, I'd suggest two critical things. Make ...


6

While I respect your intentions, it is highly unlikely (basically impossible) that any beer you make today will be good after 10+ years of aging. Ask yourself this question. If you personally are "into beer" enough to be a home brewer, why is it that you yourself have never had a 10+ year old non-distilled, barley-based beverage? The closest thing I've had ...


6

I've bulk aged wines for up to a year with no bad consequences. As long as: You kept oxygen out The airlocks didn't dry out There was sufficient sulphur in the wine The alcohol was sufficiently high It'll be fine. Definielty taste it, and report back.


5

I emailed Russian river, Avery, Boulevard, The Breury, and Lost Abbey From Vinnie at Russian River The first thing you’ll need to do is make sure the barrel is water tight, try cold water first, after that if it still leaks you’ll need to revert to hot water, the hotter the water the more flavor will leach out so start with warm water and ...


5

You can pop one open now, and it's a good learning experience to keep drinking your beer regularly so that you can see how it develops. I know, tough life! And you'll probably find like I do that the beer is at it's peak when there's one or two bottles left. 8 days may not be enough time for all the CO2 in the headspace to dissolve back into the beer, so ...


5

Abridged answer: primary them for 6 weeks, and if your gravity is where you want it, then rack to one of your PET bottles and age. Simply, you could have some off-flavors as a result of yeast autolysis. For higher-gravity beers, you want to let the yeast do their work, but if there is going to be 9 or higher ABV once fermentation is completed, that is a ...


5

There's no reason you can't ferment a 2.5 gal. batch in a 5 gal. gal. carboy, at least through 3-4 weeks of primary fermentation.


5

Without much detail regarding your recipes, your answer is going to be a bit shallow and lacking in detail. Regardless, here goes nothing: First off: Glass or plastic makes no difference in today's home brewing world as studies have shown plastic carboy's oxygen permeability is a non-issue compared to glass. Secondly, most Lambics' yeast contains wild ...


4

It's honestly a matter of taste. A lot of wines are good young. A younger shiraz (3 months aging) is going to be pretty fruity and very bright tasting. Something reminiscent of a Beaujolais nouveau, just a little deeper. At the six month mark some of that frutiness will dial down and blend in with more of a floral aroma/taste. Year old shiraz tends to ...


4

See this question: Keeping a barrel Our club put 55 gallons of Russian Imperial stout in a Merlot barrel a few weeks ago. We pumped 20 gallons of boiling water into it to sanitize. I sent an email to Russian River a few weeks ago. Here's what Guy, an assistant brewer, said: Hi Dean, We always try to get the wine barrels straight from the ...


4

Send an email to the folks are Russian River. Tell them your situation and I am sure they'll give you some advice. You may even get a response from Vinny himself. If the barrel has been stored dry, you may want to recondition it with some water. First to make sure its water tight still. Secondly, if you use boiling water this will help sanitize the ...


4

I froze a keg of Hefeweizen totally stiff. I had accidentally pulled the temp control probe out of the deep freezer that the kegs were in. The freezer ran at its "normal" freezing temps for maybe 2 days before I noticed it, so the keg was TOTALLY frozen as far as I could tell. Good news: the beer was still delicious! I had decent head on the hefe, and its ...


4

Well, you should be able to completely ferment it within 3 weeks with proper yeast health and management. Belgian Blonde is not that complex of a beer that it should take months. I'd ferment and bottle. Then you can try the beers a bottles incrementally until you think its perfect and really start drinking them. Seeing how you are going to be reusing some ...


4

I have found that the higher the OG, the longer it takes my beer to bottle condition...for something like a pale ale a month is usually enough, but my IPA goes for 3-4 months before I start drinking it.


4

Yes, you can do what you propose. A better solution, though, would be to add a bit of yeast to the keg and then bottle, rather than force carbonating. The tiny bit of bottle fermentation will help scavenge the oxygen from the bottle and promote better aging.


4

One style not already mentioned would be to brew a sour. They typically age well. For example, if you check out the back of a bottle of Boon's Mariage Parfait the best before date is typically 20+ years.


4

I think your chances of success are slim -- 21 years is a long time. You'll want a very high ABV to reduce the viability of spoilage organisms. I'd even consider fortifying the mead with neutral spirits to bring the ABV to 20% or higher. (This is also a good way to halt the fermentation at a point where the residual sweetness from honey is to you taste.) ...


4

Session beers at 1.045OG or less. Over pitched slightly coupled with the ability to keg, I've turned these types of beers around pretty quickly. Any style and yeast are fair game. Just pitch active yeast and keep the starting gravity low. Specific styles that are great for fast beers are English Ordinary Bitter and Special Bitter. English dark and light ...


4

What you propose will work fine. You can even keep StarSan in a spray bottle (mixed with distilled water it will last months or more) and spray down the surfaces. Although due to FDA regulations they have to list a longer contact time, Charlie Talley of 5 Star Chemical, makers of StarSan, has said that their tests show a 99.9% effectiveness after a 30 ...


3

Yes, hops contain two major organic acids generally refereed to as alpha acids and beta acids. When hops are added to boiling wort about 40% of the alpha acids undergo a thermal isomerization to form isoalpha acids. Iso-alpha acids are the actual bitter compound found in beer. When people talk about IBU they are talking about the concentration of isoalpha ...


3

Leaving dry hops in there for more than a 3-4 weeks usually isn't a good idea, you start to get more vegetal hop notes. I'd do it closer to bottling -- perhaps do several small dry hop additions over the course of the 3 weeks leading up to bottling.


3

I think a typical Belgian Ale lower than 1.070 shouldn't take more than 3-5 months to really come together. Unless you add weird spices that need to settle down over time, or souring bacteria that need a few months to work, then you should be good to go with any "normal" Belgian style that clocks in lower than 1.070. So Blondes, Dubbels, Tripels ... all ...


3

Sorry just got to this. Looks like you have some great info from some of the best people who would know. Did you have this barrel for 4 months or you got it after it was sitting for 4 months? Either way for future reference. If you aren't going to use a barrel for a few months you need to either burn a sulfur stick in it or fill it with a sulfur solution. ...


3

I've only made a handful of wines, so am no expert, but you might want to look into regulating the acidity, which has a pronounced affect on flavour, and also adding tannins, since these also contribute to the structure of the wine. (For the "leathery" taste you most likely need more tannins - no coincidence - tannin used to be used to produce leather.) ...



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