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Classic Cream Ales which are an American contribution to the world of beer have use flacked maize or corn as a staple ingredient for three centuries. It started out as a way to brew when barley was in short supply and expensive cutting the cost of the Grist. Cream Ales are generally lighter, less ABV, and refreshing. They do have a slight background hint of ...


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You can use normal orange peel as well. Just buy an orange or two, peel them avoiding the pith and use that. I have never found it a big difference between bitter orange and "sweet" orange peel. Most of the stuff in the homebrew stores is pretty old, at least around me anyway. The orange powder may work, but without knowing whats in it or what it is I ...


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Quick Version I don't know about the flavour. As long as you are using it with a base malt you can use up to ~50%, you don't need to get malted triticale or pre-cook it(see below). Also, I have no idea where you could find some in the UK; if you can find some flaked then try that. PS: if you know where to find some please post a link here, because I am ...


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We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!


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If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...



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