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6

Do not add the grounds. Add the liquid. And a gal. sounds like WAY too much. When I make a coffee beer, generally a cup or two of strong coffee is plenty.


3

Classic Cream Ales which are an American contribution to the world of beer have use flacked maize or corn as a staple ingredient for three centuries. It started out as a way to brew when barley was in short supply and expensive cutting the cost of the Grist. Cream Ales are generally lighter, less ABV, and refreshing. They do have a slight background hint of ...


2

You can use normal orange peel as well. Just buy an orange or two, peel them avoiding the pith and use that. I have never found it a big difference between bitter orange and "sweet" orange peel. Most of the stuff in the homebrew stores is pretty old, at least around me anyway. The orange powder may work, but without knowing whats in it or what it is I ...


2

Flaked corn does lighten the body. Body is basically thick malty sweetness, so thinning out that malty sweetness with something that ferments completely lightens the body. (I'm not sure why Tobias is suggesting adding alcohol without sweetness doesn't lighten the body, diluting the sweetness with alcohol, or water, or anything non-sweet is the definition of ...


1

Sounds like a good idea to me. The temperature is high enough to sanitize the ingredients being added, yet lower than boiling so not all the delicate volatile aromatics are driven off. You might also consider trying this with a hopback and a plate or counterflow chiller. The theory is that since the hopback and chiller are sealed, any volatiles that are ...


1

If it is boiled, last minute tops, just enough to sterilize it. My recommendation is to add it after the fermentation is completed, before bottling/kegging. If you do add them at the end of the boil, I'd probably multiply the quantity by 1.5x or even 2x. With lemongrass, I get more aroma than I do flavor. the key is to crack the lemongrass before using ...


1

When I first got into homebrewing, I started out adding my own twist to kits, I found this video really helpful when adding my own hop tea to bump up the hoppiness. You could also do a similar thing with speciality grains (such as crystal or amber malt). This will also help detract from the 'tang' you often get with kits and extract.


1

One reason is that there are some beer styles that rely on the corn flavor: for example, the Classic American Pilsner, aka Pre-Prohibition Pilsner, gets a lot of its flavor character from corn: BJCP style description


1

We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!



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