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18

You generally want to add fruit to the secondary fermentation. At this point, you already have alcohol that can help ward off any meanies hiding in your fruit. I am having trouble finding a source for this but I remember from a course I took that adding fruit to the primary will add more fruit smell and secondary would add more flavor. The smell part ...


16

I think the safest way to add hazelnut flavor to beer would be to use hazelnut extract. If you don't want to use pre-bought extract/syrup, you can make your own by chopping up the nuts, covering them with vodka (or another neutral spirit), leave it for a few days, strain off the vodka and add it to the fermenter after a couple of days of fermenting. If the ...


14

I use vanilla quite a bit to make my Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter and I've never sanitized the beans, nor suffered any ill effects from not sanitizing them. By the time they get into the beer in secondary, the alcohol content and low pH of the beer make it pretty resistant to infection. And remember, the best part of the vanilla bean is the "gunk" ...


10

Cover it in vodka (as little as possible), and put both the vanilla pod and the vodka into the beer.


9

Adding mint during the boil is good, but the problem is that you'll lose a lot of the mint aroma during primary fermentation as the C02 carries it out the airlock. The first thing that comes to mind would be to create a mint extract (soak the mint in vodka) and add that to your secondary. You can, of course, add the mint directly to the secondary, but you ...


9

It depends on what you're doing really. Adding fruit can be risky as there is always a chance of contamination. I've made fruit beers before and didn't want to boil them and lose a bunch of flavor. So instead I opted to freeze the fruit, and then slowly thaw it out in the fridge. Now keep in mind that freezing will not guarantee no contamination, but it ...


8

The risk of infection is much lower after primary fermentation is complete, since there is alcohol present. The alcohol will prevent or retard the growth of bacteria and rogue yeasts. So, you should be safe to just add your adjuncts. With some fruits (strawberries especially), I have noticed that the beer seems to spoil after a month or so, presumably ...


7

I would make a pot of really strong coffee in a french press or whatever (or espresso if you've got a machine). Ideally, add it to the secondary, because the primary fermentation will blow off a lot of the nice aroma. I've done this in a stout before and used about 4 tablespoons of coffee in 1 pint cafetiere.


7

It's fine to add any kind of rice to the mash, but the rice must be cooked to make the starches dissolvable and digestable by the amylase enzymes. If you use minute rice, it's already been cooked, so it can be added directly to the mash.


7

I can't comment yet, so here is a link. The link takes you to a BYO article that does a good job of explaining adjuncts in brewing.


6

You want to be careful adding nuts as they are very fatty. Introduction of lipids in beer can cause a lot of problems. Using powders and/or extracts is recommended. You can introduce nuts during the boil however, but you'll need to skim the contents that float to the top during the process. Still I would avoid using actual nuts.


6

In season, you can order Hop rhizomes (root cuttings) from several places, online, and possibly locally. I got mine from http://www.beer-wine.com/, located in Massachusetts, but they will ship them. I live in New England, so if that's Northeast enough, they grow fine here. I ordered 4 (two each of two varieties), but only two sprouted (I think both ...


6

I recently did a breakfast stout and simply put some ground coffee beans into the mash. I put 1 cup of ground dunkin donuts coffee in there. The coffee flavor is definitely there without being overwhelming. You can also cold brew some coffee and add at secondary or at bottling.


6

Don't worry about sterilizing the hops. If you practice good sanitation you shouldn't get an infection. I've dry hopped several beers with pellet hops strait out of the pouch and have never had an infection as a result. A lot of new brewers worry about contaminating their beers. The truth is it is pretty hard to get a contamination, you almost have to try ...


6

Yes you can mash with popped corn, it can be thought of basically as torrified corn. You do not, however want to get the buttery flavor that we typically associate with popcorn in your beer so make sure you use an air popper beforehand. You are going to get the typical corn flavors come through, not necessarily a "popcorn" flavor, if that is what you are ...


6

Do not add the grounds. Add the liquid. And a gal. sounds like WAY too much. When I make a coffee beer, generally a cup or two of strong coffee is plenty.


5

The fermented beer is resilient to infections because it has several percent of alcohol inhibiting the bacterias from reproducing. Don't sweat it, you'll be fine. I never had any problems with dry hopping. I even put fresh fruit and peppers (unboiled) and it was still fine.


5

Not only is there alcohol that will stave off some of the nasties like other responses have mentioned. But hops themselves have antibiotic properties which help your yeast get an edge over the bugs. As far as fruit type adjuncts, if you want to play it safe, you don't actually have to boil them. Just put them in a pot and raise them to 160F for ten ...


5

To answer your question "What should I do with this maple sugar?" I'll say "put it on your oatmeal". Based on my own experience and that of several friends, it's nearly impossible to get maple flavor to come through in a beer. The fermentation blows away all of the delicate maple flavor and aroma. The one beer I've tried that had any maple character at ...


4

I live in southern New Hampshire, and currently grow: Cascade - 4 plants, Centennial - plants, Hallerteau Mittelfruh - 2 plants, Nugget - 2 plants, Willamette - 2 plants. Hops grow very well in the northeast. Just be sure it gets at least half a day's sun (or more). It is important not to let them get too overgrown onto themselves, or they may harbor ...


4

I planted one Cascade hop rhizome about 10 years ago. It takes 2-3 years before you get much of a crop. These days, after drying the hops, I average 5-7 lb. from that single plant! I grow it up a 6-8 ft. high deer fence, then laterally across the top. You plant the hop rhizomes in the spring. You can buy them many places, but I get mine from ...


4

Corn will lighten the body of the beer and add a slightly sweet, "corny" flavor. It's subtle, but it's there. Corn is not just a way to cut corners. One of the finest Trappist breweries, Rochefort, reportedly uses corn in their beers.


4

You can make a rice porridge in the rice cooker that will make the rice into a thick paste (with some very soft grains still floating around). Add extra water to the rice cooker (maybe double the usual amount?), let it boil for a few minutes and then turn down the power (the rice cooker would try to boil all the liquid away if you let it). Then wait a while ...


4

Myricia Gale - Common names include Bog-myrtle and sweetgale. Also be aware: The plant has been listed as an abortifacient and therefore should not be consumed by women who are, or might be, pregnant. In the UK it is pretty easy to buy on e-bay: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/171997384055 I see from your profile/linkedIN you are may be in Spain, so take a ...


3

Have you considered making an extract from your mint using vodka? It would give you a lot of control over how minty your stout ends up. When you're ready to bottle you can take a small sample of the beer and add the mint extract until the flavor profile is what you're looking for. Then you just scale the amount up for the whole batch.


3

There are a bunch of good answers here, but I want to throw out a precaution. Don't plant from seed. A male plant is very difficult to get rid of, and it will spread and pollinate all of your female plants (and your neighbors if they grow hops too). I'm not sure what a pollinated hop tastes like, but I know for sure unpollinated ones are what you want. ...


3

We did some fruit pale ales last year with dehydrated fruit. We have a dehydrator and dried the fruit at 165 to kill off baddies and sealed it up till use. We did pineapple, kiwis, strawberries and chili peppers, non had any infection, even 6 months after. So it's an idea. Also the strawberry tasted amazing!


3

If you're looking to add real fruit to any brew you'll want to do so in secondary to get the most flavor. I've had really good success in taking my fruit of choice and pureeing it in a food processor with little vodka - about 1/4 cup per 2lb of fruit seems a good balance. The vodka will help kill off any additional bugs that may have made it past washing ...


3

I use 2 methods....you can "dry bean" the beer in secondary using 4-8 poz. of coarsely cracked beans. That produces great aroma and a bit of flavor. For more coffee flavor, I add strong coffee at bottling or kegging time to taste. That's much easier to control than additions to the kettle or secondary.


3

Too much oil from real nuts, IMO. I'd say to get some hazelbut extract and use that. You'll have to titrate it in a little at a time to get to where you want to be. Pour yourself 12oz and drop it in, mixing and stirring as you go. When the balance seems right do the math for how many 12oz there is in your whole batch , then add that many drops more to the ...



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