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19

Gyspum (CaSO4) does a couple different things. If you add it to the mash, it can lower the pH. The added sulfate content will also accentuate the bitterness of your beer. If you want to increase the sulfate for bitterness enhancement but don't want to change your mash pH, you can add it directly to the kettle. The best way to decide how much to add is to ...


9

There's probably a reason you haven't heard of people using either kiwi or papaya in brewing. Kiwi, papaya, pineapple, melon, and fig all contain enzymes (proteases) that affect proteins. Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking treats this subject. Papaya has long been used as a meat tenderizer, albeit an imperfect one. The McGee piece addresses mainly these ...


7

Fermcap-S is a silicone (Dimethylpolysiloxane) based emulsion that works by breaking surface tension. It has no effect on the finished product if used in the boil at designated dosage. If used in the fermenter, I have read that it will increase residual bitterness by ~10%. This is likely due to the compound binding to the yeast cells before the dissolved ...


6

There are a couple ways you can go about this. Just put the beans right into the secondary. You are essentially "Cold Brewing" at that point. (For about 3-4 days) Cold brew the coffee and use the syrup, and just add to taste. Definitely stay away from brewing it first you'll end up with that burnt acidic taste. As for the amount, this is really a ...


6

No offense, but try making the wheat beer without the peaches first. If this is your second batch there is a pretty high probability there are parts of your brewing process that can be optimized. Tossing peaches in there may just hide or create new problems so you won't really be able to tell whats wrong and how to fix it. Otherwise, I wouldn't worry ...


5

I've seen a great picture of an oak table leg sticking out the top of a carboy. Wish I could find it. BYO covered this question in depth. So I won't plagiarize everything here. Oak Essence and Powder Oak Chips Oak Cubes Staves and Spirals


5

Jordan, Whichever way you want to flavor a beer is fantastic! That’s part of the fun with brewing. Unless you are concerned about following the Reinheitsgebot, don’t worry about adjunct materials. I really like the way you decided to flavor your beer. If you’re looking for further suggestions, try finding wood chips soaking them in your favorite bourbon, ...


5

The only thing I use potassium metabisulfite for in brewing is the dechlorination of my tap water. I use k-meta in winemaking for several purposes: To stop the naturally occurring wild yeast and bacteria on the grapes immediately after crushing. After sulfiting the must to ~40ppm, I let it rest for about a day before pitching my cultured yeast. This ...


5

The FDA has recently decided that Fermcap S should be filtered before you drink your beer. Fortunately, there's Fermcap AT which is fine to use without filtering. Here's some info from Birko, which makes a product very much like Fermcap.. "Brewers should not use silicone-containing antifoam for unfiltered beers. The FDA allows active silicone to be ...


5

Maltodextrin dissolves easily enough that the powder can be added directly to the boil. Beginning, middle, and end are all perfectly acceptable times for the addition. However... I prefer to add unfermentable adjuncts (maltodextrin, lactose) at the same time as the priming sugar, just before I bottle the beer. Boil the maltodextrin in enough water to cover ...


4

Similar to drunk-monkey's brew club, I've done this. I used a fairly usual (in-style) porter recipe and "dry hopped" with bacon bits. I didn't use BacOs as they're soy and I'm completely against the idea, but the sort in the grocery aisle marked "real bacon bits." (Link) The only worry I had was the salt content, but it didn't seem to matter very much. The ...


4

Well, there are salt ions in all beers. It is possible that as your palatte fatigues you are just more sensitive to it. There are, however, other flavors in beer that could be interpreted as salty, but are something else. Particularly the hop profiles of the beers, perhaps. The good news is that you need more experimentation. Today: Drink 4 glasses of ...


4

Gelatin is used post fermentation. Irish moss (and whirlfloc and supermoss) go in the boil. Sometimes you can get a bit of yeast or chill haze even with kettle finings. At that point you could try gelatin to fix it. Don't boil the gelatin - that makes jello. Instead, boil 1 cup of water by itself. Take off the heat for a minute or so then whisk in ...


4

Adding cocoa 8oz of cocoa powder to the boil has always worked for me. While cocoa has water solubility issues, adding it to boiling water/wort helps out significantly. There will be some sludge in the base of the kettle, but not the entire 8oz. The only other option is to use cocoa nibs in secondary and wait for the alcohol extraction to take place. But ...


4

I spent 2 years experimenting with adding campden in an attempt to discern it's effects on oxidation. I finally stopped doing it after noticing no difference. That told me that either the campden did nothing or that I didn't have any issues for it to correct.


4

In my experience with adding Bourbon to beer I find it is best done to taste at bottling. This should give you a decent idea of how it will taste after carbonation. I would also recommend having someone help with the tasting since your palate can become fatigued quite quickly.


4

Put a known volume of beer in tasting glasses or cups. Use measuring spoons to dose each cup with a different amount until you get the level of flavor that you want. Keep notes so that you can do it again. I'm pretty sure that it will scale linearly, so if e.g. an ounce tastes good in 12oz of beer, then around 50oz will taste good in a full (5-gallon) ...


4

Irish moss is available at any homebrew supply outlet, often in small bottles with the instructions right on the label. Use 1 tsp. per 5 gallons of beer at the last 15-20 minutes of the boil. It will not affect the flavor of the beer with such a low dosage, assuming you're not harvesting it yourself. Its purpose is to latch onto proteins in the beer and ...


3

Roast the nibs to bring out their flavor then use them in the secondary. Roast like you would coffee or in a heavy skillet over medium heat until fragrant and flavorful.


3

Papazian has the following to say about the amount to use for the spices in question: Cinnamon - Two teaspoons of ground or 3-4 inches (7-10 cm) of a stick during the final 10-15 minutes of the boil. (Though with "small amounts, its flavor is not quite identifiable, yet its presence is noticed by all.") Orange peel - "About 1/2 oz. (14g) will do for 5 ...


3

Over the summer a home brew club out of St Louis mad a BLT beer for an event trying to make the world's largest BLT sandwich. For the bacon beer, they made a smoked porter and "dry-hopped" with Bacos. It got in the bacon flavoring without the grease from real bacon http://www.showmebeer.com/2009/08/blt-beer.html


3

I have always done the mini test being careful to note the volumes and ratio as I build the blend in the pint glass. When I comes time to execute the whole batch I usually would only add 90-95% of what I calculated from my single glass ratio to the whole batch. Then I would taste it and ease up to the final flavor profile I was looking for. You can always ...


3

Based purely on personal experiance I would say ~200g of boiled ginger per 23L will give a light background taste. I use ~1kg to make it the most prominent taste (like the ginger cider I brewed last weekend).


2

I have added coffee and was really happy with the results. My next brew is going to have vanilla soaked in bourbon added to it, so we will see how that turns out!


2

Garret Oliver from Brooklyn Brewery has been experimenting with bacon in beer. http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/bowling-for-brews/


2

A conglomeration of your answers and my own, here is my solution. I will report back... http://bit.ly/cYI0kz Excerpt: So, here’s my plan. I’m going to put a slotted baking sheet over a regular flat baking sheet. I’m going to make some sort of awesome contraption of tin foil that will keep the bacon somewhat vertical. Like seats, for the bacon. ...


2

I'm not certain about grams per gallon (why are you mixing metric and english?). The general rule for wine (and probably cider as well) is one campden tablet or 1/8th tsp of k-meta per gallon. According to wikipedia one campden tablet typically weighs .44 grams and 10 campden tablets equals 1 tsp of k-meta so I'd guess between .44 and .55 grams of k-meta ...


2

I have found that using them just like a dry hop works well. Throw them in to secondary and you should be able to rack your beer out without picking up any nibs. *(I have heard of people calling it dry nibbing)



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