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17

The amount of acid in a properly mixed batch of StarSan is less than in a bottle of Coke. I've been using it for years and find it extremely effective as a sanitizer. I never rinse and it has had no adverse effect on my beer. In fact, I've won several awards since I started using it. The commonly heard refrain is "Don't fear the foam!"


8

I had similar fears after reading the warnings on the label until I read Palmer's How to Brew, 3rd Ed. p. 23, as part of his discussion of different methods of cleaning and sanitizing: StarSan is only effective when the pH of the solution is less than 3.5. ... This is also the reason it is a no-rinse sanitizer: When the fermenter or bottle has been ...


4

The difference between "drinking" tap water and "rinsing" with it is that our body can handle whatever small amount of bacteria may be in the water, but the conditions for fermenting beer are also ideal for bacteria to grow and multiply so that insignificant amount of bacteria we normally drink can grow under the right conditions (in the fermenter or bottle) ...


1

5 ml. of lactic acid will be tasteless in your beer. I don't know why it's there, but you can skip it. 5 oz. of dextrose will not make much difference to the beer and is the normal amount used for bottle priming. Are you sure it isn't for that? Unmalted wheat flakes have no enzymes and can't be used without mashing with a base malt to convert the ...


1

It's difficult to remove acidity from wine without affecting the flavour. You can add salts (calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate) to remove some acidity but this is considered a "last resort" solution. This PDF claims that honey contains malic acid, though it doesn't give a breakdown. It does, however, indicate that gluconic acid is the primary organic ...


1

Reading a little about humulone isomerisation, it seems that both Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions catalyse the reaction, while aqueous alkali is also mentioned (see e.g. Table 8.2 in However, Brewing: Science and Practice by Chris A. Boulton and Peter A. Brookes). All three are present in your tap water but not in the distilled. I would conclude that the bitterness you ...


1

This study demonstrated that iso-alpha acids degraded more quickly in low pH environments, particularly at lower temperatures. If I'm understanding this correctly, I think this means that lower pH beers will lose bitterness over time, compared to high pH. Perhaps your experiments are showing the same effect. The high pH samples were more bitter because the ...


1

The lemon zest/peel is going to mostly give you a hint of lemon flavor and does little to the pH, which would be what the citric acid is there for. You could definitely use both and have it turn out fine and it will also turn out fine with neither, but the result will taste different. The difference is going to come down to preferences. If you already know ...



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