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I have seen someone added coffee in a stout beer, I want to use it in batch of my beer (18 liters), to do so I have two ideas:

  1. To combine grains of coffee with mash.
  2. Make an espresso and add it to the mosh before the hop was added.

Which option is the most feasible to get a better result in a Porter style beer? Also, How many grains of coffee would you recommend?

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2 Answers 2

I know you are looking for an amount of coffee to add, but actual coffee is not the way to get coffee flavor out of your brew. the coffee bean contains oils which will inhibit your head retention and some other effects. I'm no expert on this topic so do your own research, but I use grains like chocolate malt,and some roasted barley depending on what coffee flavor you are looking for. consider using some vanilla bean maybe cinnamon in small amounts. really just look up coffee porter recipes and get a feel for the dark grain bill.

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1  
I've gotten some coffee character out of "Pale Chocolate" malt myself. –  Graham Nov 21 '12 at 14:07
    
why would you add vanilla and cinnamon?, what is the benefit, I suppose that is going to change the flavor and smell, even using a little amount? –  cMinor Dec 12 '12 at 17:12

There are a number of ways to brew with actual coffee:

  • Add hot or cold brewed coffee to the beer
  • Soak coffee grounds in the beer (usually at flameout, or in secondary)

For both techniques the coffee can be added at various points in the brewing cycle: at the end of the boil, after fermentation has finished, or at bottling/kegging time.

Opinions vary on which method of extraction produces the best flavor. If you add grounds, I'd probably avoid mashing or boiling them and either add them at flameout, or in the fermenter. The advantage to adding them in the fermenter is you can taste the beer until it has the amount of coffee flavor you want, then rack it to another vessel or bottle it. If you brew the coffee, you can add a bit at a time and taste it until you have the amount you want.

I made a coffee porter by cold brewing about 20 oz of coffee (about 1/2 cup of ground coffee soaked in cold water for 36 hours) and adding it with the priming sugar at bottling time. The coffee flavor was noticeable but not overwhelming. Depending on the type of beer, more could be used. Head retention was not affected.

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