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This is already after the fact, since the batch has been consumed but... My pale ale that I made had quite a 'yeasty' taste. It still wasn't bad, though I would have preferred it to be a bit milder. What is a good course of action to take the next time around to help resolve that? More/less time in fermentation? Use secondary? More time bottle-conditioning? Would any of these affect the yeast taste at all? Thanks!

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It'd probably be helpful if you can list as much detail as you have about what you did. –  Mlusby Apr 13 '11 at 18:33
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Which yeast strain? How long did you ferment for? –  markskar Apr 13 '11 at 19:31
    
Thanks everyone. Sorry I forgot I asked this question until I logged in today. <sheepish grin> I don't know what yeast strain it was - whatever comes with the Mr. Beer kit... I gave it 3 weeks in primary fermentation (no secondary) and another 3 weeks bottle conditioning, then 1 week in the refrigerator. It lasted about 2-3 weeks beyond that. –  antman's clone Apr 29 '11 at 20:29
    
I should also say, it was exposed to light throughout fermentation. No direct sunlight. I just had it on the kitchen counter, so the temperature fluctuation was probably more than if it were in the closet. Probably 64-70 degree range. I did put the bottles in a box in the closet for conditioning. –  antman's clone Apr 29 '11 at 20:35

2 Answers 2

Without knowing more about which yeast strain you used it is hard to say if a yeasty taste would be expected, but more time in primary and secondary fermenters would likely solve the issue.

Also, if you have available space in a fridge, cold crashing in secondary for a few days to a week before bottling/kegging can help clear the beer and make a lot more of the yeasties drop out.

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Thanks for the tip. I'm thinking about doing a Hefeweizen next, so I may try that. –  antman's clone Apr 29 '11 at 20:31

In general, more time in fermentation (said without knowing how much time you gave it) and more time and cold to clear it after fermentation is complete. Also, the strain of yeast you use can play a part.

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