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I've been scouring the internet, trying to find some kind of list of the SMM content in various malts so I know when it would be wise to do a 90 minute boil. I can't find anything, just the definition of the off-flavor.

I know Pilsner malts are high, but that's it!

Any others?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to this study, the use of nitrogen fertiliser can increase SMM levels in (malting) barley across the board.

This guy seems to have the right answer though:

When using all pilsener malt or pale malt, it may be advisable to boil your wort for at least 90 minutes to reduce the Dimethyl Sulfide levels.

He also notes that the DMS flavour is more detectable in the lighter styles of beer:

Lighter beers with high adjunct ratios or low gravity beers will allow the off flavor and odor to be more detectable, while dark German beers, all-malt beers and any other flavorful beer will hide the canned corn notes.

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Good answer, thanks! –  Brian Apr 15 '11 at 3:45
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6-row pale malts have higher concentrations of SMM than 2-row pale malts.

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These days, the diastatic power of 2 row and 6 row malts is nearly the same. –  Denny Conn Apr 13 '11 at 21:31
    
Thanks a bunch for the downvote Denny. Okay, I edited the part about diastatic power out. My answer to the question at hand here stands. –  markskar Apr 14 '11 at 18:06
    
I didn't do the downvote. Poor assumption. –  Denny Conn Apr 14 '11 at 18:33
    
Ah, my apologies then. –  markskar Apr 14 '11 at 19:34
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In general, the lighter the malt the more SMM it will have.

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