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I was planning to make an IPA and was planning to use wyeast #1056 but i think that I mixed up my yeast with another guy at the store cus after I pitched i noticed that the yeast I had added was actually Wyeast #1275 Thames Valley Ale.

My beer is really cloudy still after a week in primary and another week on secondary.

Does anyone know if this will ever clear or maybe it is just what that yeast produces?

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3 Answers

You're rushing things...let the beer, not the calendar, make the schedule. Give the beer 2-4 weeks in primary from now on.

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From the description of the yeast it sounds like you just have to give it more time. Your yeast is probably just being very active. You just need to wait for them to eat the sugars and calm down and you should be good to go.

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I haven't used Wyeast 1275, Thames Valley Ale, but I've brewed with 1056, American Ale, plenty of times, and 1056 usually isn't very clear to begin with. From the description of 1275, I doubt it would be much hazier, if any.

Given that both yeasts make cloudy beer, and that if you dry-hopped your IPA, you further muddied the waters, I wouldn't expect any less, and I wouldn't be surprised if the beer stays murky.

You can try cooling the beer to get particulate matter to drop out of suspension. I would recommend getting it down to around 40°F if that's possible with your setup.

If you're still not happy with the appearance, you can try adding finings for clarification.

Turns out, there's a great post here that covers steps to clarify beer.

Personally, I would be more interested in the flavor and aroma variations as a result of the yeast swap than any appearance changes. You should expect your beer to be less estery and taste more grainy like a British beer... should be interesting.

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thanks for the post...I did dry hop the batch (good guess). I will cooling the beer as you suggest and will look into the finings. I am also quite interrested in what favors this differen tyeast creates. thanks again. –  Steve Reitenbach Nov 28 '10 at 6:01
    
Yeah, dry hopping will make the beer somewhat cloudy, and that's just fine. In fact, a lot of folks expect a cloudy IPA. –  sgwill Nov 28 '10 at 14:41
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