Take the 2-minute tour ×
Homebrewing Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for dedicated home brewers and serious enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Will be modifying a recipe and while I know the alpha % of the bittering hops and this being the first time I'm altering a recipe I'm wondering during the boiling process have I added enough bittering hops or do I need more.

Can I assume that 30 minutes into a 60 minute boil the wort should be twice as bitter at the end of the boil?

Lets say I haven't added enough bittering hops, what can I do? What if I've added to much?

I"m trying to find out if I can use any guidelines while the boil is going on.

The recipe is the northern brewer dead ringer (all-grain) with cascade hops (10% alpha).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Bitterness is not linear throughout the boil, so you cannot assume that it will be twice as bitter after 60 minutes vs. 30 minutes. I'm also not sure that you're going to get a great sense of the bitterness in the partially-boiled wort vs. the finished beer, but I don't have a really compelling argument as to why not.

But I'm not understanding something about your question. If you have a recipe that adds A amount of B AA% hops at time C to achieve a computed IBU value D … why not use those parameters to figure out what you need to do for your modified recipe? If you want more IBUs, then adjust. If you're using different hops with a different AA%, then adjust.

At least from what I've seen from other brewers, this is something you adjust brew-to-brew, not within a brew itself.

share|improve this answer
2  
The perception of bitterness will be affected by the sweetness of the wort. It will taste considerably less bitter than the finished beer. –  Tobias Patton Jul 25 at 0:58
1  
I respectfully disagree with that statement Tobias. Theoretically you should be correct, but almost every wort sample I've tasted was like bitter orange marmalade. I think wort can have hop particles in suspension, which is why it can taste so bitter. –  Graham Jul 25 at 13:31
    
I'm just trying to see what options I have during the boil, which doesn't seem like much. I have the recipe in beersmith and adjusted it for the new hops, this is just the first time I've done this and I'm also just curious. –  Brendon-Van-Heyzen Jul 25 at 15:20
1  
I don't think it's so much hop particles in suspension as that as the beer ferments, interaction between the yeast and hops "tames" the bitterness. –  Denny Conn Jul 25 at 18:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.