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I am thinking of brewing a 20 gallon batch in two parts on two different days back to back. Has anyone tried this before? I am dealing with a maximum volume of 15 gallons in my brew pot but, my fermenter will hold up to 24 gallons. I'm thinking if I treat each batch as it's own and add the second days batch to the first's I should be ok right? Should I use my normal yeast pitching rates for each batch or, adjust the yeast for the total volume and pitch on the first day?

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2 Answers 2

A lot of commercial breweries do that. Most that I know pitch a normal, or slightly larger, amount of yeast for the first batch. By the time the second is added, there has been enough yeast growth to accommodate it.

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I have seen it -- a local microbrewer has a 20-BBL brewhouse and 60- or 80-BBL unitanks -- and done it: Texas Two-Step Method of doing a full boil where the boil volume exceeds kettle volume. I did just as @Denny suggests: by the time I am ready to transfer the second batch into the fermenter, the first batch is approaching high krausen. So the whole yeast pitch for the final volume goes into the first batch, and it is like a giant starter for the second batch. Turned out very well despite my doubts. –  Chino Brews Feb 27 at 20:26
    
Essentially, you can just look at the first batch as a gigantic 50% yeast starter. –  BrianV Mar 1 at 16:16

You guys did it the easy way! Wish I read this 18 months ago! I did 2 batches, one after the other because it didnt occur to me that I could wait a day. I just made 2 extract "kits". while the 1st was boiling, the 2nd was steeping. I wanted all of it to ferment together for uniformity or consistancy. it was all for a party. My problem though, was bottling. I only had 6.5 gallon bottling buckets and 10 gallons of beer. I had to bribe a friend with a 6-pack to help so the process went quickly. (I was too green to realize that the carbonation takes more than the time it takes to bottle).

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So the beer wasn't carbonated for the party? How soon was the party after bottling? –  Another Compiler Error Mar 4 at 13:55
    
Oh it was ready for the party, I just thought I had to bottle the whole batch at the same time, about 4 weeks before the party if memory serves... –  Ugly Dude Mar 5 at 19:27

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