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I used both homebrew kits before and had no problems... But used tap water and granulated sugar.

Coopers lager, wilcos home wine kit ... Both worked before.

Both brews 25℃ and stored at Temperature 21℃+ minimum

So I just lost a brew of coopers lager using bottled spring water and brewing sugar, the initial fermentation was a sudden frothy explosion but after cleaning the fermenter lidd and putting a clean bubbler on there was no further fermentation... Stored the wort and just one day of fermentation. So unable to find a answer other than some contamination I threw the wort away. :(

Then I stetalised everything with thin bleach and rinsed clean.

I started a red home wine this time. But used slightly less sugar as the wine was just a bit sweet and quite high alcohol level, but got much better after a few weeks ... Did use granulated sugar but used brewer's sugar this time.

I used the same bottled water and this morning no fermentation has started . Been 12 hours now and supposedly a rapid fermentation. It is possible that the water is preventing the yeast from working so was contemplating making up a fresh yeast with tap water and adding this to the fermenter once the yeast has got started.

I'm not using bottled water again if it's causing these problems.

I'm new to this, our tap water is very hard, just wanted to make a crisp clear drink with less hard water taste.

Any thoughts anyone ?

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1 Answer 1

I use bottled water frequently without any problems, so I don't think that's your problem. When you say fermentation stopped, are you basing that on a gravity reading or just observation? Fermentation can be continuing even if it doesn't appear that it is. The only way to know for sure is to take a gravity reading.

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Especially if the primary fermentation is done at 25 C. A beer with a lowish starting gravity (1.040 or thereabouts) could be completely fermented in 24 hours at that temperature. –  Tobias Patton Dec 2 '13 at 17:42

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