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I have kegged my last two batches...an IPA and a Stout. First batch was sanitized with Star-San. I experienced very uncomfortable side effects: headaches, muscle aches, and a sense of fatigue. So for the stout, I sanitized everything using bleach. Experienced the exact same side effects! The only constant has been the co2 used. How is it possible two different brews would elicit the same very uncomfortable side effects? I am paranoid about brewing again. Thanks, Fred

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Is this your first 2 batches? Has it happened with previous batches? Does it happen with commercially bought beer, or other friends' homebrew? –  mdma Dec 1 '13 at 16:10
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Are the effects immediate, or do they occur some hours later? –  Tobias Patton Dec 1 '13 at 16:54
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Sounds like what most of us call a "hangover" :P. The only thing I can think of is that the keg was made with, or treated with, some chemical that you are sensitive to. It's unusual, but can happen... –  Ryno Dec 1 '13 at 23:48
    
Do you rinse everything after using bleach with a lot of water? When you sanitize, first you use bleach, then you need to rinse well, then you use a food-grade sanitizer (don't know about star-san). –  NLemay Dec 6 '13 at 15:01
    
You said you've sanitized everything... but what's your chilling process like? That is, describe in detail everything you do from the second you cut the heat on your boil to the second you put the fermenter away. –  ssdecontrol Dec 15 '13 at 21:54
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1 Answer 1

Sounds like you're experiencing hangover-like symptoms. Hangovers from homebrew can be caused by fusel alcohols. Fusels are generally considered to be an "off" flavor and in large amounts create a hot, solventy taste (think paint thinner, or bad vodka). You didn't mention anything about your fermentation, but fusel production is generally the result of high fermentation temperatures (>72) and they increase with gravity.

That being said, even a well brewed beer will have low levels of fusel alcohols, and they are more noticeable in certain styles like strong Belgians that have yeast strains that naturally kick off more.

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