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I'm wondering how this can be converted to an extract recipe. Initially it was thought we could just do 14lbs (US 2 row) * .75 = 10.5lbs of extract, but then the question was asked if the rest of the specialty grains would just be steeped like normal? Steeping like 7.75 lbs of grain seems like an awful lot. Should they all be steeped, and if so, any recommendations on how to steep that many lbs?

The Recipe

This 5 gallon Imperial Porter recipe is the product of discussions between the xBrewers involved based on each one’s individual experiences and opinions.

Estimated Stats (at 70% brewhouse efficiency)

PBG: 1.068                       SRM: 34.6

OG: 1.100                        IBU: 50

FG: 1.024                        ABV: 10.2%

Yeast- (this will be the brewer’s choice,
original recipe calls for Wyeast Thames Valley Ale Yeast)

Grain Bill (154 degrees F 90 min mash)

14lbs- US 2 Row

1lb 8oz- UK Brown Malt

1lb- US Chocolate Malt

1lb 8oz- UK Amber Malt                              

1lb- US Carapils

8oz- UK Wheat

4oz- US Caramel 20L

2lb-  US Munich 20L

Hop Schedule (90 min boil)

1 oz- Magnum (90 min)

1/2 oz- UK Fuggle (10 min from end)

1/2 oz- US Willamette (10 min from end)

1/2 oz- UK Fuggle (at turnoff)

1/2 oz- US Willamette  (at turnoff)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Firstly, I think your conversion to extract is off. You'll need 8.25 lbs of dry or 9.8 lbs of liquid. (See below)

You can get amber, wheat and Munich malt extracts. This leaves you with 3.75 lbs of steeping grains - a much more manageable amount. Some wheat malts are a half-and-half mix of wheat and 2-row malts, so be sure to adjust your amounts accordingly.


All malts have a "points per pound per gallon" rating. This tells you how many points of extract they yield when mashed. 2-row is usually rated at 37ppg. Therefore, 14 lbs of 2-row gives you 518 points. You then multiply that by the efficiency (70%) to get a total of 362.6 expected points from the mash. Dry and liquid malt extracts are rated at 44 and 37 points respectively and don't suffer from efficiency. To get the weight of extract, divide 362.6 by the corresponding extract ppg.

I'll leave it as an exercise to the reader to calculate the amounts of amber, wheat and Munich malt extracts needed. The formula:

(lbs of grain) * (grain ppg) * (brewhouse efficiency) / (extract ppg)

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So I think the converted recipe would look like this. I ended up getting the ppg's from a bunch of different places, so I'm not positive they are right. Anyone see any problems?

  • Amber: 1.5 * 32 * .7 / 37 = .91
  • Wheat: .5 * 38 *.7 / 37 = .36
  • Munich: 2 * 32 * .7 / 37 = 1.2
  • Pale: 14 * 37 * .7 / 37 = 9.8

Recipe

Estimated Stats (at 70% brewhouse efficiency)

PBG: 1.068                       SRM:
34.6

OG: 1.100                          IBU: 50

FG: 1.024                          ABV: 10.2%

**Yeast**- (this will be the brewer’s choice, original recipe calls for Wyeast Thames Valley Ale Yeast)

**Extract**

9.8lbs Pale Malt Extract

.91lbs Amber Malt Extract

.36lbs Wheat Malt Extract

1.2lbs Munich Malt Extract

**Steeping Grains**

1lb 8oz- UK Brown Malt

1lb- US Chocolate Malt                


1lb- US Carapils

4oz- US Caramel 20L


**Hop Schedule** (90 min boil)

1 oz- Magnum (90 min)

1/2 oz- UK Fuggle (10 min from end)

1/2 oz- US Willamette (10 min from end)

1/2 oz- UK Fuggle (at turnoff)

1/2 oz- US Willamette  (at turnoff)
share|improve this answer
    
Double check against the HomebrewTalk Wiki malts chart: homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart –  Dean Brundage Jan 5 '10 at 14:31
    
The PPG rating for each malt comes from the maltster and varies by manufacturer, but should be very similar for each type of malt. Double check against the HomebrewTalk Wiki malt chart: homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart –  Dean Brundage Jan 5 '10 at 14:34
    
Thanks! That chart was the thing I needed and could not find. –  Jordan Jan 5 '10 at 16:37

7.75 lbs of steeped grains seems like a lot to me. I don't know how well those are going to fit in a grain bag.

Suggestion 1 - Use two grain bags and two kettles.

You might also not get all the flavors / sugars out of that many grains.

Suggestion 2 - Steep for a full 60 minutes

If you do this all in one big grain bag, a lot of the flavors and whatnot might get trapped in the middle.

Suggestion 3 - Sparge. Or at least recirculate. Hold the grain bag above the kettle, and pour some hot water (170˚ or so) over it to rinse the grains.

That's all I've got. That's a massive bill. I hope it rocks!

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