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As I was boiling my yeast starter, I measured it in a hydrometer, and it read 1.040. I knew the temperature would distort it upwards, but I didn't know by how much...

I've already pitched, and out of curiosity I measured some more in a hydrometer, and I've discovered it at 1.070.

Is it better to do a 1.070 OG yeast starter than to do none at all, or will it stress the yeast in some fashion that will affect the overall batch?

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You could decant about half the wort from the starter and top up with sterile water. –  mdma Aug 22 '13 at 9:07
    
@MDMA, if I get rid of half of the original yeast, this won't matter because the yeast starter will grow so much more anyways? –  Matthew Moisen Aug 22 '13 at 16:01
    
Yep, the amount grown by a starter is mainly influenced by the size of the starter, not the initial population size. –  mdma Aug 22 '13 at 16:23
    
Of course, you could use the decanted yeast to make a 2nd starter if you have another container and some wort. –  mdma Aug 22 '13 at 16:34
    
@MDMA, I managed to let the yeast starter go for about 24-36 hours before I near-halved it and added water to take the OG to ten-40. I was wondering what you thought of this--if one realizes their yeast starter has to high of an OG, and they fail to lower it immediately, is it better to let it run its course, or to lower it when they have time, even 24-48 hours after pitching? –  Matthew Moisen Aug 28 '13 at 17:11

1 Answer 1

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Yes, the yeast will be more stressed and less healthy than they would be in a lower OG starter. Chances are that you'll be OK, but in the future it would be better to do a lower gravity starter and have healthier, better performing yeast. I use .75 oz. DME per cup of water for a starter in the 1.035-1.040 range. Weigh your DME, don't use volume measurement for it.

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Thanks @Denny, but I asked if a 1.070 is worse than not doing a yeast starter at all, as opposed to doing a proper yeast starter at 1.040. Thank you. –  Matthew Moisen Aug 23 '13 at 23:29
    
Then to directly answer your question, no, a 1.070 starter isn't worse than no starter. –  Denny Conn Aug 24 '13 at 15:46

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